Books > Old Books > The White Peacock (1906)


Page 3

PART I - CHAPTER I
THE PEOPLE OF NETHERMERE


I STOOD watching the shadowy fish slide through the gloom of the mill-pond. They were grey, descendants of the silvery things that had darted away from the monks, in the young days when the valley was lusty. The whole place was gathered in the musing of old age. The thick-piled trees on the far shore were too dark and sober to dally with the sun; the weeds stood crowded and motionless. Not even a little wind flickered the willows of the islets. The water lay softly, intensely still. Only the thin stream falling through the mill-race murmured to itself of the tumult of life which had once quickened the valley.
I was almost startled into the water from my perch on the alder roots by a voice saying:
'Well, what is there to look at?' My friend was a young farmer, stoutly built, brown eyed, with a naturally fair skin burned dark and fteckled in patches. He laughed, seeing me start, and looked down at me with lazy curiosity.
`I was thinking the place seemed old, brooding over its past.'
He looked at me with a lazy indulgent smile, and lay down on his back on the bank, saying:
`It's all right for a doss-here.'
`Your life is nothing else but a doss. I shall laugh when somebody jerks you awake,' I replied.
He smiled comfortably and put his hands over his eyes because of the light.
'Why shall you laugh?' he drawled.
`Because you'll be amusing,' said I.
We were silent for a long time, when he rolled over and began to poke with his finger in the bank.
'`I thought,' he said in his leisurely fashion, `there was sIbme cause for all this buzzing.'

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE I STOOD watching what is shadowy fish slide through what is gloom of what is mill-pond. They were grey, descendants of what is silvery things that had darted away from what is monks, in what is young days when what is valley was lusty. what is whole place was gathered in what is musing of old age. what is thick-piled trees on what is far shore were too dark and sober to dally with what is sun; what is weeds stood crowded and motionless. Not even a little wind flickered what is willows of what is islets. what is water lay softly, intensely still. Only what is thin stream falling through what is mill-race murmured to itself of what is tumult of life which had once quickened what is valley. I was almost startled into what is water from my perch on what is alder roots by a voice saying: 'Well, what is there to look at?' My friend was a young farmer, stoutly built, brown eyed, with a naturally fair skin burned dark and fteckled in patches. He laughed, seeing me start, and looked down at me with lazy curiosity. `I was thinking what is place seemed old, brooding over its past.' He looked at me with a lazy indulgent smile, and lay down on his back on what is bank, saying: `It's all right for a doss-here.' `Your life is nothing else but a doss. I shall laugh when somebody jerks you awake,' I replied. He smiled comfortably and put his hands over his eyes because of what is light. 'Why shall you laugh?' he drawled. `Because you'll be amusing,' said I. We were silent for a long time, when he rolled over and began to poke with his finger in what is bank. '`I thought,' he said in his leisurely fashion, `there was sIbme cause for all this buzzing.' where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The White Peacock (1906) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 3 where is strong PART I - CHAPTER I what is PEOPLE OF NETHERMERE where is p align="justify" I STOOD watching what is shadowy fish slide through what is gloom of what is mill-pond. They were grey, descendants of what is silvery things that had darted away from what is monks, in what is young days when what is valley was lusty. what is whole place was gathered in what is musing of old age. what is thick-piled trees on what is far shore were too dark and sober to dally with what is sun; what is weeds stood crowded and motionless. Not even a little wind flickered what is willows of what is islets. what is water lay softly, intensely still. Only what is thin stream falling through what is mill-race murmured to itself of what is tumult of life which had once quickened what is valley. I was almost startled into what is water from my perch on what is alder roots by a voice saying: 'Well, what is there to look at?' My friend was a young farmer, stoutly built, brown eyed, with a naturally fair skin burned dark and fteckled in patches. He laughed, seeing me start, and looked down at me with lazy curiosity. `I was thinking what is place seemed old, brooding over its past.' He looked at me with a lazy indulgent smile, and lay down on his back on what is bank, saying: `It's all right for a doss-here.' `Your life is nothing else but a doss. I shall laugh when somebody jerks you awake,' I replied. He smiled comfortably and put his hands over his eyes because of what is light. 'Why shall you laugh?' he drawled. `Because you'll be amusing,' said I. We were silent for a long time, when he rolled over and began to poke with his finger in what is bank. '`I thought,' he said in his leisurely fashion, `there was sIbme cause for all this buzzing.' where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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