Books > Old Books >The Vikar Of WakeField (1776)


Page IX

INTRODUCTION

pictures of character and manners, and above all, that broad and fine humanity so indulgent and yet so enamoured of sweet goodness, are lost upon us of this generation, only, we hope, to be re-discovered by our children to their increasing delight.
To return to the Vicar. One naturally asks what is the charm that holds us and makes us return to it again and again as a source of such consolation and delightremember it is not only over the simple that it holds such sway-with Bunyan's allegory it lies constantly on the table of even the illiterate. It was the book Charles Dickens took to bed with him every night, they say. Goethe claimed that it was the greatest novel of his day, and finely acknowledged his debt to it at the critical period of his life.
If one were to attempt to analyse its power over us, one would be inclined to use an almost unforgivable paradox and say-that it lay in the " art of perfect artlessness," the power so to break down the dam of selfconsciousness that the stream of pure feeling and fine humanity might flow freely from the heart into the course prepared for it of perfect style. The paradox will seem even more evident as we look at the outward life of the author in all its wayward pomp and vanity and selfconsciousness. But the truth contained therein, we venture to think, will be still more clear when we know intimately all there is to know of Oliver Goldsmith. In other words, to feel all the charm of the " Vicar of Wakefield," we must know fully the life of him who wrote it, for then we shall find the story is but thinly disguised biography, the biography of a man-whatever the outward show might be of as true gentleness and pure feeling, and of as fine a humanity as ever lived.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE pictures of character and manners, and above all, that broad and fine humanity so indulgent and yet so enamoured of sweet goodness, are lost upon us of this generation, only, we hope, to be re-discovered by our children to their increasing delight. To return to what is Vicar. One naturally asks what is what is charm that holds us and makes us return to it again and again as a source of such consolation and delightremember it is not only over what is simple that it holds such sway-with Bunyan's allegory it lies constantly on what is table of even what is illiterate. It was what is book Charles Dickens took to bed with him every night, they say. Goethe claimed that it was what is greatest novel of his day, and finely acknowledged his debt to it at what is critical period of his life. If one were to attempt to analyse its power over us, one would be inclined to use an almost unforgivable paradox and say-that it lay in what is " art of perfect artlessness," what is power so to break down what is dam of selfconsciousness that what is stream of pure feeling and fine humanity might flow freely from what is heart into what is course prepared for it of perfect style. what is paradox will seem even more evident as we look at what is outward life of what is author in all its wayward pomp and vanity and selfconsciousness. But what is truth contained therein, we venture to think, will be still more clear when we know intimately all there is to know of Oliver Goldsmith. In other words, to feel all what is charm of what is " Vicar of Wakefield," we must know fully what is life of him who wrote it, for then we shall find what is story is but thinly disguised biography, what is biography of a man-whatever what is outward show might be of as true gentleness and pure feeling, and of as fine a humanity as ever lived. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The Vikar Of WakeField (1776) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page IX where is p align="center" where is strong INTRODUCTION where is p align="justify" pictures of character and manners, and above all, that broad and fine humanity so indulgent and yet so enamoured of sweet goodness, are lost upon us of this generation, only, we hope, to be re-discovered by our children to their increasing delight. To return to what is Vicar. One naturally asks what is what is charm that holds us and makes us return to it again and again as a source of such consolation and delightremember it is not only over the simple that it holds such sway-with Bunyan's allegory it lies constantly on what is table of even what is illiterate. It was what is book Charles Dickens took to bed with him every night, they say. Goethe claimed that it was what is greatest novel of his day, and finely acknowledged his debt to it at what is critical period of his life. If one were to attempt to analyse its power over us, one would be inclined to use an almost unforgivable paradox and say-that it lay in what is " art of perfect artlessness," what is power so to break down what is dam of selfconsciousness that what is stream of pure feeling and fine humanity might flow freely from what is heart into what is course prepared for it of perfect style. what is paradox will seem even more evident as we look at what is outward life of what is author in all its wayward pomp and vanity and selfconsciousness. But the truth contained therein, we venture to think, will be still more clear when we know intimately all there is to know of Oliver Goldsmith. In other words, to feel all what is charm of what is " Vicar of Wakefield," we must know fully what is life of him who wrote it, for then we shall find what is story is but thinly disguised biography, what is biography of a man-whatever what is outward show might be of as true gentleness and pure feeling, and of as fine a humanity as ever lived. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: The Vikar Of Wake Field (1776) books

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