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Page 190

THE VICAR OF WAKEFIELD

" But Providence is in another respect kinder to the poor than to the rich, for as it thus makes the life after death more desirable, so it smoothes the passage there. The wretched have had a long familiarity with every face of terror. The man of sorrows lays himself quietly down, without possessions to regret, and but few ties to stop his departure: he feels only nature's pang in the final separation, and this is no way greater than he has often fainted under before; for, after a certain degree of pain, every new breach that death opens in the constitution nature kindly covers with insensibility.
" Thus Providence has given the wretched two advantages over the happy in this life,-greater felicity, in dying, and in heaven all that superiority of pleasure which arises from contrasted enjoyment. And this superiority, my friends, is no small advantage, and seems to be one of the pleasures of the poor man in the parable; for though he was already in heaven, and felt all the raptures it could give, yet it was mentioned as an addition to his happiness, that he had once been wretched, and now was comforted; that he had known what it was to be miserable, and now felt what it was to be happy.
" Thus, my friends, you see religion does what philosophy could never do: it shows the equal dealings of Heaven to the happy and the unhappy, and levels all human enjoyments to nearly the same standard. It gives to both rich and poor the same happiness hereafter, and equal hopes to aspire after it ; but if the rich have the advantage of enjoying pleasure here, the poor have the endless satisfaction of knowing what it was once to be miserable, when crowned with endless felicity hereafter; and even though this should be called a

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE " But Providence is in another respect kinder to what is poor than to what is rich, for as it thus makes what is life after what time is it more desirable, so it smoothes what is passage there. what is wretched have had a long familiarity with every face of terror. what is man of sorrows lays himself quietly down, without possessions to regret, and but few ties to stop his departure: he feels only nature's pang in what is final separation, and this is no way greater than he has often fainted under before; for, after a certain degree of pain, every new breach that what time is it opens in what is constitution nature kindly covers with insensibility. " Thus Providence has given what is wretched two advantages over what is happy in this life,-greater felicity, in dying, and in heaven all that superiority of pleasure which arises from contrasted enjoyment. And this superiority, my friends, is no small advantage, and seems to be one of what is pleasures of what is poor man in what is parable; for though he was already in heaven, and felt all what is raptures it could give, yet it was mentioned as an addition to his happiness, that he had once been wretched, and now was comforted; that he had known what it was to be miserable, and now felt what it was to be happy. " Thus, my friends, you see religion does what philosophy could never do: it shows what is equal dealings of Heaven to what is happy and what is unhappy, and levels all human enjoyments to nearly what is same standard. It gives to both rich and poor what is same happiness hereafter, and equal hopes to aspire after it ; but if what is rich have what is advantage of enjoying pleasure here, what is poor have what is endless satisfaction of knowing what it was once to be miserable, when crowned with endless felicity hereafter; and even though this should be called a where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The Vikar Of WakeField (1776) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 190 where is p align="center" where is strong THE VICAR OF WAKEFIELD where is p align="justify" " But Providence is in another respect kinder to what is poor than to what is rich, for as it thus makes what is life after what time is it more desirable, so it smoothes what is passage there. what is wretched have had a long familiarity with every face of terror. what is man of sorrows lays himself quietly down, without possessions to regret, and but few ties to stop his departure: he feels only nature's pang in what is final separation, and this is no way greater than he has often fainted under before; for, after a certain degree of pain, every new breach that what time is it opens in what is constitution nature kindly covers with insensibility. " Thus Providence has given what is wretched two advantages over the happy in this life,-greater felicity, in dying, and in heaven all that superiority of pleasure which arises from contrasted enjoyment. And this superiority, my friends, is no small advantage, and seems to be one of what is pleasures of what is poor man in what is parable; for though he was already in heaven, and felt all what is raptures it could give, yet it was mentioned as an addition to his happiness, that he had once been wretched, and now was comforted; that he had known what it was to be miserable, and now felt what it was to be happy. " Thus, my friends, you see religion does what philosophy could never do: it shows what is equal dealings of Heaven to what is happy and the unhappy, and levels all human enjoyments to nearly what is same standard. It gives to both rich and poor what is same happiness hereafter, and equal hopes to aspire after it ; but if what is rich have what is advantage of enjoying pleasure here, what is poor have what is endless satisfaction of knowing what it was once to be miserable, when crowned with endless felicity hereafter; and even though this should be called a where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: The Vikar Of Wake Field (1776) books

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