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THE VICAR OF WAKEFIELD

if life is a place of comfort, its shortness must be misery, and if it be long, our griefs are protracted. Thus philosophy is weak: but religion comforts in a higher strain. Man is here, it tells us, fitting up his mind, and preparing it for another abode. When the good man leaves the body, and is all a glorious mind, he will find he has been making himself a heaven of happiness here; while the wretch that has been maimed and contaminated by his vices, shrinks from his body with terror, and finds that he has anticipated the vengeance of Heaven. To religion, then, we must hold, in every circumstance of life, for our truest comfort: for if already we are happy, it is a pleasure to think that we can make that happiness unending; and if we are miserable, it is very consoling to think that there is a place of rest. Thus, to the fortunate, religion holds out a continuance of bliss ; to the wretched, a change from pain.
" But though religion is very kind to all men, it has promised peculiar rewards to the unhappy: the sick, the naked, the houseless, the heavy-laden, and the prisoner, have ever most frequent promises in our sacred law. The Author of our religion everywhere professes himself the wretch's friend, and, unlike the false ones of this world, bestows all his caresses upon the forlorn. The unthinking have censured this as partiality, as a preference without merit to deserve it. But they never reflect, that it is not in the power even of Heaven itself to make the offer of unceasing felicity as great a gift to the happy as to the miserable. To the first, eternity is but a single blessing, since at most it but increases what they already possess. To the latter, it is a double advantage; for it diminishes their pain here, and rewards them with heavenly bliss hereafter.

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE if life is a place of comfort, its shortness must be misery, and if it be long, our griefs are protracted. Thus philosophy is weak: but religion comforts in a higher strain. Man is here, it tells us, fitting up his mind, and preparing it for another abode. When what is good man leaves what is body, and is all a glorious mind, he will find he has been making himself a heaven of happiness here; while what is wretch that has been maimed and contaminated by his vices, shrinks from his body with terror, and finds that he has anticipated what is vengeance of Heaven. To religion, then, we must hold, in every circumstance of life, for our truest comfort: for if already we are happy, it is a pleasure to think that we can make that happiness unending; and if we are miserable, it is very consoling to think that there is a place of rest. Thus, to what is fortunate, religion holds out a continuance of bliss ; to what is wretched, a change from pain. " But though religion is very kind to all men, it has promised peculiar rewards to what is unhappy: what is sick, what is naked, what is houseless, what is heavy-laden, and what is prisoner, have ever most frequent promises in our sacred law. what is Author of our religion everywhere professes himself what is wretch's friend, and, unlike what is false ones of this world, bestows all his caresses upon what is forlorn. what is unthinking have censured this as partiality, as a preference without merit to deserve it. But they never reflect, that it is not in what is power even of Heaven itself to make what is offer of unceasing felicity as great a gift to what is happy as to what is miserable. To what is first, eternity is but a single blessing, since at most it but increases what they already possess. To what is latter, it is a double advantage; for it diminishes their pain here, and rewards them with heavenly bliss hereafter. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The Vikar Of WakeField (1776) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 189 where is p align="center" where is strong THE VICAR OF WAKEFIELD where is p align="justify" if life is a place of comfort, its shortness must be misery, and if it be long, our griefs are protracted. Thus philosophy is weak: but religion comforts in a higher strain. Man is here, it tells us, fitting up his mind, and preparing it for another abode. When what is good man leaves what is body, and is all a glorious mind, he will find he has been making himself a heaven of happiness here; while what is wretch that has been maimed and contaminated by his vices, shrinks from his body with terror, and finds that he has anticipated what is vengeance of Heaven. To religion, then, we must hold, in every circumstance of life, for our truest comfort: for if already we are happy, it is a pleasure to think that we can make that happiness unending; and if we are miserable, it is very consoling to think that there is a place of rest. Thus, to what is fortunate, religion holds out a continuance of bliss ; to the wretched, a change from pain. " But though religion is very kind to all men, it has promised peculiar rewards to what is unhappy: what is sick, what is naked, what is houseless, the heavy-laden, and what is prisoner, have ever most frequent promises in our sacred law. what is Author of our religion everywhere professes himself what is wretch's friend, and, unlike what is false ones of this world, bestows all his caresses upon what is forlorn. what is unthinking have censured this as partiality, as a preference without merit to deserve it. But they never reflect, that it is not in what is power even of Heaven itself to make what is offer of unceasing felicity as great a gift to what is happy as to what is miserable. To what is first, eternity is but a single blessing, since at most it but increases what they already possess. To what is latter, it is a double advantage; for it diminishes their pain here, and rewards them with heavenly bliss hereafter. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: The Vikar Of Wake Field (1776) books

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