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THE VICAR OF WAKEFIELD

regarding myself as a legislator, who had brought men from their native ferocity into friendship and obedience.
And it were highly to be wished, that legislative power would thus direct the law rather to reformation than severity ; that it would seem convinced that the work of eradicating crimes is not by making punishment familiar, but formidable. Then, instead of our present prisons, which find or make men guilty, which enclose wretches for the commission of one crime, and return them, if returned alive, fitted for the perpetration of thousands; we should see, as in other parts of Europe, places of penitence and solitude, where the accused might be attended by such as could give them repentance, if guilty, or new motives to virtue, if innocent. And this, but not the increasing punishments, is the way to mend a state. Nor can I avoid even questioning the validity of that right which social combinations have assumed, of capitally punishing offences of a slight nature. In cases of murder, their right is obvious, as it is the duty of us all, from the law of self-defence, to cut off that man who has shown a disregard for the life of another. Against such, all nature rises in arms; but it is not so against him who steals my property. Natural law gives me no right to take away his life, as, by that, the horse he steals is as much his property as mine. If, then, I have any right, it must be from a compact made between us, that he who deprives the other of his horse shall die. But this is a false compact; because no man has a right to barter his life no more than to take it away, as it is not his own. And besides, the compact is inadequate, and would be set aside, even in a court of modern equity, as there is a great penalty for a very trifling convenience, since it is far

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE regarding myself as a legislator, who had brought men from their native ferocity into friendship and obedience. And it were highly to be wished, that legislative power would thus direct what is law rather to reformation than severity ; that it would seem convinced that what is work of eradicating crimes is not by making punishment familiar, but formidable. Then, instead of our present prisons, which find or make men guilty, which enclose wretches for what is commission of one crime, and return them, if returned alive, fitted for what is perpetration of thousands; we should see, as in other parts of Europe, places of penitence and solitude, where what is accused might be attended by such as could give them repentance, if guilty, or new motives to virtue, if innocent. And this, but not what is increasing punishments, is what is way to mend a state. Nor can I avoid even questioning what is validity of that right which social combinations have assumed, of capitally punishing offences of a slight nature. In cases of murder, their right is obvious, as it is what is duty of us all, from what is law of self-defence, to cut off that man who has shown a disregard for what is life of another. Against such, all nature rises in arms; but it is not so against him who steals my property. Natural law gives me no right to take away his life, as, by that, what is horse he steals is as much his property as mine. If, then, I have any right, it must be from a compact made between us, that he who deprives what is other of his horse shall die. But this is a false compact; because no man has a right to barter his life no more than to take it away, as it is not his own. And besides, what is compact is inadequate, and would be set aside, even in a court of modern equity, as there is a great penalty for a very trifling convenience, since it is far where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The Vikar Of WakeField (1776) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 173 where is p align="center" where is strong THE VICAR OF WAKEFIELD where is p align="justify" regarding myself as a legislator, who had brought men from their native ferocity into friendship and obedience. And it were highly to be wished, that legislative power would thus direct what is law rather to reformation than severity ; that it would seem convinced that what is work of eradicating crimes is not by making punishment familiar, but formidable. Then, instead of our present prisons, which find or make men guilty, which enclose wretches for what is commission of one crime, and return them, if returned alive, fitted for what is perpetration of thousands; we should see, as in other parts of Europe, places of penitence and solitude, where what is accused might be attended by such as could give them repentance, if guilty, or new motives to virtue, if innocent. And this, but not what is increasing punishments, is what is way to mend a state. Nor can I avoid even questioning what is validity of that right which social combinations have assumed, of capitally punishing offences of a slight nature. In cases of murder, their right is obvious, as it is what is duty of us all, from what is law of self-defence, to cut off that man who has shown a disregard for what is life of another. Against such, all nature rises in arms; but it is not so against him who steals my property. Natural law gives me no right to take away his life, as, by that, what is horse he steals is as much his property as mine. If, then, I have any right, it must be from a compact made between us, that he who deprives what is other of his horse shall die. But this is a false compact; because no man has a right to barter his life no more than to take it away, as it is not his own. And besides, what is compact is inadequate, and would be set aside, even in a court of modern equity, as there is a great penalty for a very trifling convenience, since it is far where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: The Vikar Of Wake Field (1776) books

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