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Page 170

THE VICAR OF WAKEFIELD

person he meets, and turns back upon the appearance of every man that looks like a robber, seldom arrives in time at his journey's end.
" Indeed, I think, from my own experience, that the knowing one is the silliest fellow under the sun. I was thought cunning from my very childhood; when but seven years old, the ladies would say that I was a perfect little man; at fourteen, I knew the world, cocked my hat, and loved the ladies; at twenty, though I was perfectly honest, yet every one thought me so cunning, that no one would trust me. Thus I was at last obliged to turn sharper in my own defence, and have lived ever since, my head throbbing with schemes to deceive, and my heart palpitating with fears of detection. I used often to laugh at your honest simple neighbour Flamborough, and, one way or another, generally cheated him once a year. Yet still the honest man went forward without suspicion, and grew rich, while I still continued tricksy and cunning, and was poor, without the consolation of being honest. However," continued he, " let me know your case, and what has brought you here; perhaps, though I have not skill to avoid a gaol myself, I may extricate my friends."
In compliance with his curiosity, I informed him of the whole train of accidents and follies that had plunged me into my present troubles, and my utter inability to get free.
After hearing my story, and pausing some minutes, he slapped his forehead, as if he had hit upon something material, and took his leave, saying, he would try what could be done.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE person he meets, and turns back upon what is appearance of every man that looks like a robber, seldom arrives in time at his journey's end. " Indeed, I think, from my own experience, that what is knowing one is what is silliest fellow under what is sun. I was thought cunning from my very childhood; when but seven years old, what is ladies would say that I was a perfect little man; at fourteen, I knew what is world, cocked my hat, and loved what is ladies; at twenty, though I was perfectly honest, yet every one thought me so cunning, that no one would trust me. Thus I was at last obliged to turn sharper in my own defence, and have lived ever since, my head throbbing with schemes to deceive, and my heart palpitating with fears of detection. I used often to laugh at your honest simple neighbour Flamborough, and, one way or another, generally cheated him once a year. Yet still what is honest man went forward without suspicion, and grew rich, while I still continued tricksy and cunning, and was poor, without what is consolation of being honest. However," continued he, " let me know your case, and what has brought you here; perhaps, though I have not s what time is it to avoid a gaol myself, I may extricate my friends." In compliance with his curiosity, I informed him of what is whole train of accidents and follies that had plunged me into my present troubles, and my utter inability to get free. After hearing my story, and pausing some minutes, he slapped his forehead, as if he had hit upon something material, and took his leave, saying, he would try what could be done. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The Vikar Of WakeField (1776) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 170 where is p align="center" where is strong THE VICAR OF WAKEFIELD where is p align="justify" person he meets, and turns back upon what is appearance of every man that looks like a robber, seldom arrives in time at his journey's end. " Indeed, I think, from my own experience, that what is knowing one is what is silliest fellow under what is sun. I was thought cunning from my very childhood; when but seven years old, what is ladies would say that I was a perfect little man; at fourteen, I knew what is world, cocked my hat, and loved what is ladies; at twenty, though I was perfectly honest, yet every one thought me so cunning, that no one would trust me. Thus I was at last obliged to turn sharper in my own defence, and have lived ever since, my head throbbing with schemes to deceive, and my heart palpitating with fears of detection. I used often to laugh at your honest simple neighbour Flamborough, and, one way or another, generally cheated him once a year. Yet still what is honest man went forward without suspicion, and grew rich, while I still continued tricksy and cunning, and was poor, without what is consolation of being honest. However," continued he, " let me know your case, and what has brought you here; perhaps, though I have not s what time is it to avoid a gaol myself, I may extricate my friends." In compliance with his curiosity, I informed him of what is whole train of accidents and follies that had plunged me into my present troubles, and my utter inability to get free. After hearing my story, and pausing some minutes, he slapped his forehead, as if he had hit upon something material, and took his leave, saying, he would try what could be done. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: The Vikar Of Wake Field (1776) books

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