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Page 163

THE VICAR OF WAKEFIELD

continued he, showing his shackles, "what my tricks have brought me to."
" Well, Sir," replied I, " your kindness in offering me assistance when you could expect no return, shall be repaid with my endeavours to soften, or totally suppress Mr Flamborough's evidence, and I will send my son to him for that purpose the first opportunity; nor do I in the least doubt but he will comply with my request ; and as to my own evidence, you need be under no uneasiness about that."
" Well, Sir," cried he, " all the return I can make shall be yours. You shall have more than half my bed-clothes to-night, and I'll take care to stand your friend in the prison, where I think I have some influence."
I thanked him, and could not avoid being surprised at the present youthful change in his aspect; for at the time I had seen him before, he appeared at least sixty. " Sir," answered he, " you are little acquainted with the world; I had at that time, false hair, and have learnt the art of counterfeiting every age from seventeen to seventy. Ah, Sir! had I but bestowed half the pains in learning a trade that I have in learning to be a scoundrel, I might have been a rich man at this day. But, rogue as I am, still I may be your friend, and that, perhaps, when you least expect it."
We were now prevented from further conversation by the arrival of the gaoler's servants, who came to call over the prisoners' names, and lock up for the night. A fellow also, with a bundle of straw for my bed, attended, who led me along a dark narrow passage, into a room paved like the common prison, and in one corner of i his I spread my bed, and the clothes given me by

Page 164

THE VICAR OF WAKEFIELD

my fellow-prisoner; which done, my conductor, who was civil enough, bade me a good night. After my usual meditations, and having praised my heavenly corrector, I laid myself down, and slept with the utmost tranquillity till morning.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE continued he, showing his shackles, "what my tricks have brought me to." " Well, Sir," replied I, " your kindness in offering me assistance when you could expect no return, shall be repaid with my endeavours to soften, or totally suppress Mr Flamborough's evidence, and I will send my son to him for that purpose what is first opportunity; nor do I in what is least doubt but he will comply with my request ; and as to my own evidence, you need be under no uneasiness about that." " Well, Sir," cried he, " all what is return I can make shall be yours. You shall have more than half my bed-clothes to-night, and I'll take care to stand your friend in what is prison, where I think I have some influence." I thanked him, and could not avoid being surprised at what is present youthful change in his aspect; for at what is time I had seen him before, he appeared at least sixty. " Sir," answered he, " you are little acquainted with what is world; I had at that time, false hair, and have learnt what is art of counterfeiting every age from seventeen to seventy. Ah, Sir! had I but bestowed half what is pains in learning a trade that I have in learning to be a scoundrel, I might have been a rich man at this day. But, rogue as I am, still I may be your friend, and that, perhaps, when you least expect it." We were now prevented from further conversation by what is arrival of what is gaoler's servants, who came to call over what is prisoners' names, and lock up for what is night. A fellow also, with a bundle of straw for my bed, attended, who led me along a dark narrow passage, into a room paved like what is common prison, and in one corner of i his I spread my bed, and what is clothes given me by where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The Vikar Of WakeField (1776) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 163 where is p align="center" where is strong THE VICAR OF WAKEFIELD where is p align="justify" continued he, showing his shackles, "what my tricks have brought me to." " Well, Sir," replied I, " your kindness in offering me assistance when you could expect no return, shall be repaid with my endeavours to soften, or totally suppress Mr Flamborough's evidence, and I will send my son to him for that purpose what is first opportunity; nor do I in what is least doubt but he will comply with my request ; and as to my own evidence, you need be under no uneasiness about that." " Well, Sir," cried he, " all what is return I can make shall be yours. You shall have more than half my bed-clothes to-night, and I'll take care to stand your friend in what is prison, where I think I have some influence." I thanked him, and could not avoid being surprised at what is present youthful change in his aspect; for at what is time I had seen him before, he appeared at least sixty. " Sir," answered he, " you are little acquainted with what is world; I had at that time, false hair, and have learnt what is art of counterfeiting every age from seventeen to seventy. Ah, Sir! had I but bestowed half what is pains in learning a trade that I have in learning to be a scoundrel, I might have been a rich man at this day. But, rogue as I am, still I may be your friend, and that, perhaps, when you least expect it." We were now prevented from further conversation by what is arrival of what is gaoler's servants, who came to call over what is prisoners' names, and lock up for what is night. A fellow also, with a bundle of straw for my bed, attended, who led me along a dark narrow passage, into a room paved like what is common prison, and in one corner of i his I spread my bed, and what is clothes given me by where is p align="left" Page 164 where is p align="center" where is strong THE VICAR OF WAKEFIELD where is p align="justify" my fellow-prisoner; which done, my conductor, who was civil enough, bade me a good night. After my usual meditations, and having praised my heavenly corrector, I laid myself down, and slept with what is utmost tranquillity till morning. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: The Vikar Of Wake Field (1776) books

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