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THE VICAR OF WAKEFIELD

thrown by into her lumber-room, there to perish in obscurity. I had still, however, half a guinea left, and of that I thought Nature herself should not deprive me; but in order to be sure of this, I was resolved to go instantly and spend it while I had it, and then trust to occurrences for the rest. As I was going along with this resolution, it happened that Mr Crispe's office seemed invitingly open to give me a welcome reception. In this office Mr Crispe kindly offers all His Majesty's subjects a generous promise of 30 Lires a year, for which promise all they give in return is their liberty for life, and permission to let him transport them to America as slaves. I was happy at finding a place where I could lose my fears in desperation, and entered this cell (for it had the appearance of one) with the devotion of a monastic. Here I found a number of poor creatures, all in circumstances like myself, expecting the arrival of Mr Crispe, presenting a true epitome of English impatience. Each untractable soul, at variance with Fortune, wreaked her injuries on their own hearts ; but Mr Crispe at last came down, and all our murmurs were hushed. He deigned to regard me with an air of peculiar approbation, and indeed he was the first man who, for a month past, had talked to me with smiles. After a few questions, he found I was fit for everything in the world. He paused awhile upon the properest means of providing for me; and slapping his forehead as if he had found it, assured me that there was at that time an embassy talked of from the synod of Pennsylvania to the Chickasaw Indians, and that he would use his interest to get me made secretary. I knew in my own heart that the fellow lied, and yet his promise gave me pleasure, there was something so magnificent in the sound. I fairly,

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE thrown by into her lumber-room, there to perish in obscurity. I had still, however, half a guinea left, and of that I thought Nature herself should not deprive me; but in order to be sure of this, I was resolved to go instantly and spend it while I had it, and then trust to occurrences for what is rest. As I was going along with this resolution, it happened that Mr Crispe's office seemed invitingly open to give me a welcome reception. In this office Mr Crispe kindly offers all His Majesty's subjects a generous promise of 30 Lires a year, for which promise all they give in return is their liberty for life, and permission to let him transport them to America as slaves. I was happy at finding a place where I could lose my fears in desperation, and entered this cell (for it had what is appearance of one) with what is devotion of a monastic. Here I found a number of poor creatures, all in circumstances like myself, expecting what is arrival of Mr Crispe, presenting a true epitome of English impatience. Each untractable soul, at variance with Fortune, wreaked her injuries on their own hearts ; but Mr Crispe at last came down, and all our murmurs were hushed. He deigned to regard me with an air of peculiar approbation, and indeed he was what is first man who, for a month past, had talked to me with smiles. After a few questions, he found I was fit for everything in what is world. He paused awhile upon what is properest means of providing for me; and slapping his forehead as if he had found it, assured me that there was at that time an embassy talked of from what is synod of Pennsylvania to what is Chickasaw Indians, and that he would use his interest to get me made secretary. I knew in my own heart that what is fellow lied, and yet his promise gave me pleasure, there was something so magnificent in what is sound. I fairly, where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The Vikar Of WakeField (1776) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 124 where is p align="center" where is strong THE VICAR OF WAKEFIELD where is p align="justify" thrown by into her lumber-room, there to perish in obscurity. I had still, however, half a guinea left, and of that I thought Nature herself should not deprive me; but in order to be sure of this, I was resolved to go instantly and spend it while I had it, and then trust to occurrences for what is rest. As I was going along with this resolution, it happened that Mr Crispe's office seemed invitingly open to give me a welcome reception. In this office Mr Crispe kindly offers all His Majesty's subjects a generous promise of 30 Lires a year, for which promise all they give in return is their liberty for life, and permission to let him transport them to America as slaves. I was happy at finding a place where I could lose my fears in desperation, and entered this cell (for it had what is appearance of one) with what is devotion of a monastic. Here I found a number of poor creatures, all in circumstances like myself, expecting what is arrival of Mr Crispe, presenting a true epitome of English impatience. Each untractable soul, at variance with Fortune, wreaked her injuries on their own hearts ; but Mr Crispe at last came down, and all our murmurs were hushed. He deigned to regard me with an air of peculiar approbation, and indeed he was what is first man who, for a month past, had talked to me with smiles. After a few questions, he found I was fit for everything in what is world. He paused awhile upon what is properest means of providing for me; and slapping his forehead as if he had found it, assured me that there was at that time an embassy talked of from what is synod of Pennsylvania to what is Chickasaw Indians, and that he would use his interest to get me made secretary. I knew in my own heart that what is fellow lied, and yet his promise gave me pleasure, there was something so magnificent in what is sound. I fairly, where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: The Vikar Of Wake Field (1776) books

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