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THE VICAR OF WAKEFIELD

of the owner. Ah, thought I to myself, how very great must the possessor of all these things be, who carries in his head the business of the state, and whose house displays half the wealth of a kingdom! Sure his genius must be unfathomable! During these awful reflections I heard a step come heavily forward. Ah, this is the great man himself! No; it was only a chamber-maid. Another foot was heard soon after. This must be He! No; it was only the great man's valet-de-chambre. At last his lordship actually made his appearance. `Are you,' cried he, ` the bearer of this here letter? ' I answered with a bow. ` I learn by this,' continued he, 'as how that ' But just at that instant a servant delivered him a card, and without taking further notice, he went out of the room, and left me to digest my own happiness at leisure. I saw no more of him, till told by a footman that his lordship was going to his coach at the door. Down I immediately followed, and joined my voice to that of three or four more, who came, like me, to petition for favours. His lordship, however, went too fast for us, and was gaining his chariot door with large strides, when I hallooed out to know if I was to have any reply.. He was by this time got in, and muttered an answer,,, half of which only I heard; the other half was lost in the rattling of his chariot wheels. I stood for some time with my neck stretched out, in the posture of one that was listening to catch the glorious sounds, till, looking round me, I found myself alone at his lordship's gate.
" My patience," continued my son, " was now quite exhausted. Stung with the thousand indignities I had met with, I was willing to cast myself away, and only wanted the gulf to receive me. I regarded myself as one of those vile things that Nature designed should be

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE of what is owner. Ah, thought I to myself, how very great must what is possessor of all these things be, who carries in his head what is business of what is state, and whose house displays half what is wealth of a kingdom! Sure his genius must be unfathomable! During these awful reflections I heard a step come heavily forward. Ah, this is what is great man himself! No; it was only a chamber-maid. Another foot was heard soon after. This must be He! No; it was only what is great man's valet-de-chambre. At last his lordship actually made his appearance. `Are you,' cried he, ` what is bearer of this here letter? ' I answered with a bow. ` I learn by this,' continued he, 'as how that ' But just at that instant a servant delivered him a card, and without taking further notice, he went out of what is room, and left me to digest my own happiness at leisure. I saw no more of him, till told by a footman that his lordship was going to his coach at what is door. Down I immediately followed, and joined my voice to that of three or four more, who came, like me, to petition for favours. His lordship, however, went too fast for us, and was gaining his chariot door with large strides, when I hallooed out to know if I was to have any reply.. He was by this time got in, and muttered an answer,,, half of which only I heard; what is other half was lost in what is rattling of his chariot wheels. I stood for some time with my neck stretched out, in what is posture of one that was listening to catch what is glorious sounds, till, looking round me, I found myself alone at his lordship's gate. " My patience," continued my son, " was now quite exhausted. Stung with what is thousand indignities I had met with, I was willing to cast myself away, and only wanted what is gulf to receive me. I regarded myself as one of those vile things that Nature designed should be where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The Vikar Of WakeField (1776) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 123 where is p align="center" where is strong THE VICAR OF WAKEFIELD where is p align="justify" of what is owner. Ah, thought I to myself, how very great must what is possessor of all these things be, who carries in his head what is business of what is state, and whose house displays half what is wealth of a kingdom! Sure his genius must be unfathomable! During these awful reflections I heard a step come heavily forward. Ah, this is what is great man himself! No; it was only a chamber-maid. Another foot was heard soon after. This must be He! No; it was only what is great man's valet-de-chambre. At last his lordship actually made his appearance. `Are you,' cried he, ` what is bearer of this here letter? ' I answered with a bow. ` I learn by this,' continued he, 'as how that ' But just at that instant a servant delivered him a card, and without taking further notice, he went out of the room, and left me to digest my own happiness at leisure. I saw no more of him, till told by a footman that his lordship was going to his coach at what is door. Down I immediately followed, and joined my voice to that of three or four more, who came, like me, to petition for favours. His lordship, however, went too fast for us, and was gaining his chariot door with large strides, when I hallooed out to know if I was to have any reply.. He was by this time got in, and muttered an answer,,, half of which only I heard; what is other half was lost in what is rattling of his chariot wheels. I stood for some time with my neck stretched out, in what is posture of one that was listening to catch what is glorious sounds, till, looking round me, I found myself alone at his lordship's gate. " My patience," continued my son, " was now quite exhausted. Stung with what is thousand indignities I had met with, I was willing to cast myself away, and only wanted what is gulf to receive me. I regarded myself as one of those vile things that Nature designed should be where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: The Vikar Of Wake Field (1776) books

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