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THE VICAR OF WAKEFIELD

when not filled by another, and to assist at tattering a kip, as the phrase was when he had a mind for a frolic. Besides this, I had twenty other little employments in the family. I was to do many small things without bidding: to carry the corkscrew; to stand godfather to all the butler's children; to sing when I was bid; to be never out of humour; always to be humble, and, if I could, to be very happy.
" In this honourable post, however, I was not without a rival. A captain of marines, who was formed for the place by nature, opposed me in my patron's affections. His mother had been laundress to a man of quality, and thus he early acquired a taste for pimping and pedigree. As this gentleman made it the study of his life to be acquainted with lords, though he was dismissed from several for his stupidity, yet he found many of them, who were as dull as himself, that permitted his assiduities. As flattery was his trade, he practised it with the easiest address imaginable; but it came awkward and stiff from me; and as every day my patron's desire of flattery increased, so every hour, being better acquainted with his defects, I became more unwilling to give it. Thus, I was once more fairly going to give the field to the captain, when my friend found occasion for my assistance. This was nothing less than to fight a duel for him with a gentleman whose sister it was pretended he had used ill. I readily complied with this request ; and though I see you are displeased at my conduct, yet, as it was a debt indispensably due to friendship, I could not refuse. I undertook the affair, disarmed my antagonist, and soon after had the pleasure of finding that the lady was only a woman of the town, and the fellow her bully and a sharper. This piece of service was repaid with the

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE when not filled by another, and to assist at tattering a kip, as what is phrase was when he had a mind for a frolic. Besides this, I had twenty other little employments in what is family. I was to do many small things without bidding: to carry what is corkscrew; to stand godfather to all what is butler's children; to sing when I was bid; to be never out of humour; always to be humble, and, if I could, to be very happy. " In this honourable post, however, I was not without a rival. A captain of marines, who was formed for what is place by nature, opposed me in my patron's affections. His mother had been laundress to a man of quality, and thus he early acquired a taste for person ing and pedigree. As this gentleman made it what is study of his life to be acquainted with lords, though he was dismissed from several for his stupidity, yet he found many of them, who were as dull as himself, that permitted his assiduities. As flattery was his trade, he practised it with what is easiest address imaginable; but it came awkward and stiff from me; and as every day my patron's desire of flattery increased, so every hour, being better acquainted with his defects, I became more unwilling to give it. Thus, I was once more fairly going to give what is field to what is captain, when my friend found occasion for my assistance. This was nothing less than to fight a duel for him with a gentleman whose sister it was pretended he had used ill. I readily complied with this request ; and though I see you are displeased at my conduct, yet, as it was a debt indispensably due to friendship, I could not refuse. I undertook what is affair, disarmed my antagonist, and soon after had what is pleasure of finding that what is lady was only a woman of what is town, and what is fellow her bully and a sharper. This piece of service was repaid with what is where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The Vikar Of WakeField (1776) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 121 where is p align="center" where is strong THE VICAR OF WAKEFIELD where is p align="justify" when not filled by another, and to assist at tattering a kip, as what is phrase was when he had a mind for a frolic. Besides this, I had twenty other little employments in what is family. I was to do many small things without bidding: to carry what is corkscrew; to stand godfather to all what is butler's children; to sing when I was bid; to be never out of humour; always to be humble, and, if I could, to be very happy. " In this honourable post, however, I was not without a rival. A captain of marines, who was formed for what is place by nature, opposed me in my patron's affections. His mother had been laundress to a man of quality, and thus he early acquired a taste for person ing and pedigree. As this gentleman made it what is study of his life to be acquainted with lords, though he was dismissed from several for his stupidity, yet he found many of them, who were as dull as himself, that permitted his assiduities. As flattery was his trade, he practised it with what is easiest address imaginable; but it came awkward and stiff from me; and as every day my patron's desire of flattery increased, so every hour, being better acquainted with his defects, I became more unwilling to give it. Thus, I was once more fairly going to give what is field to what is captain, when my friend found occasion for my assistance. This was nothing less than to fight a duel for him with a gentleman whose sister it was pretended he had used ill. I readily complied with this request ; and though I see you are displeased at my conduct, yet, as it was a debt indispensably due to friendship, I could not refuse. I undertook what is affair, disarmed my antagonist, and soon after had what is pleasure of finding that what is lady was only a woman of the town, and what is fellow her bully and a sharper. This piece of service was repaid with what is where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: The Vikar Of Wake Field (1776) books

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