Books > Old Books >The Vikar Of WakeField (1776)


Page 113

THE VICAR OF WAKEFIELD

stage. His voice, his figure, and attitudes are all admirable. We caught him up accidentally in our journey down." This account in some measure excited our curiosity, and, at the entreaty of the ladies, I was prevailed upon to accompany them to the play-house, which was no other than a barn. As the company with which I went was incontestably the chief of the place, we were received with the greatest respect, and placed in the front seat of the theatre, where we sat for some time with no small impatience to see Horatio make his appearance. The new performer advanced at last; and let parents think of my sensations by their own, when I found it was my unfortunate son! He was going to begin; when, turning his eyes upon the audience, he perceived Miss Wilmot and me, and stood at once speechless and immovable.
The actors behind the scene, who ascribed this pause to his natural timidity, attempted to encourage him; but instead of going on, he burst into a flood of tears, and retired off the stage. I don't know what were my feelings on this occasion, for they succeeded with too much rapidity for description; but I was soon awaked from this disagreeable reverie by Miss Wilmot, who, pale, and with a trembling voice, desired me to conduct her back to her uncle's. When got home, Mr Arnold, who was as yet a stranger to our extraordinary behaviour, being informed that the new performer was my son, sent his coach and an invitation for him; and as he persisted in his refusal to appear again upon the stage, the players put another in his place, and we soon had him with us. Mr Arnold gave him the kindest reception, and I received him with my usual transport ; for I could never counterfeit false resentment. Miss Wilmot's

Page 114

THE VICAR OF WAKEFIELD

reception was mixed with seeming neglect, and yet I could perceive she acted a studied part. The tumult in her mind seemed not yet abated: she said twenty giddy things that looked like joy, and then laughed loud at her own want of meaning. At intervals she would take a sly peep at the glass, as if happy in the consciousness of unresisted beauty; and often would ask questions, without giving any manner of attention to the answers.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE stage. His voice, his figure, and attitudes are all admirable. We caught him up accidentally in our journey down." This account in some measure excited our curiosity, and, at what is entreaty of what is ladies, I was prevailed upon to accompany them to what is play-house, which was no other than a barn. As what is company with which I went was incontestably what is chief of what is place, we were received with what is greatest respect, and placed in what is front seat of what is theatre, where we sat for some time with no small impatience to see Horatio make his appearance. what is new performer advanced at last; and let parents think of my sensations by their own, when I found it was my unfortunate son! He was going to begin; when, turning his eyes upon what is audience, he perceived Miss Wilmot and me, and stood at once speechless and immovable. what is actors behind what is scene, who ascribed this pause to his natural timidity, attempted to encourage him; but instead of going on, he burst into a flood of tears, and retired off what is stage. I don't know what were my feelings on this occasion, for they succeeded with too much rapidity for description; but I was soon awaked from this disagreeable reverie by Miss Wilmot, who, pale, and with a trembling voice, desired me to conduct her back to her uncle's. When got home, Mr Arnold, who was as yet a stranger to our extraordinary behaviour, being informed that what is new performer was my son, sent his coach and an invitation for him; and as he persisted in his refusal to appear again upon what is stage, what is players put another in his place, and we soon had him with us. Mr Arnold gave him what is kindest reception, and I received him with my usual transport ; for I could never counterfeit false resentment. Miss Wilmot's where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The Vikar Of WakeField (1776) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 113 where is p align="center" where is strong THE VICAR OF WAKEFIELD where is p align="justify" stage. His voice, his figure, and attitudes are all admirable. We caught him up accidentally in our journey down." This account in some measure excited our curiosity, and, at what is entreaty of what is ladies, I was prevailed upon to accompany them to what is play-house, which was no other than a barn. As what is company with which I went was incontestably what is chief of what is place, we were received with what is greatest respect, and placed in what is front seat of what is theatre, where we sat for some time with no small impatience to see Horatio make his appearance. what is new performer advanced at last; and let parents think of my sensations by their own, when I found it was my unfortunate son! He was going to begin; when, turning his eyes upon what is audience, he perceived Miss Wilmot and me, and stood at once speechless and immovable. what is actors behind what is scene, who ascribed this pause to his natural timidity, attempted to encourage him; but instead of going on, he burst into a flood of tears, and retired off what is stage. I don't know what were my feelings on this occasion, for they succeeded with too much rapidity for description; but I was soon awaked from this disagreeable reverie by Miss Wilmot, who, pale, and with a trembling voice, desired me to conduct her back to her uncle's. When got home, Mr Arnold, who was as yet a stranger to our extraordinary behaviour, being informed that what is new performer was my son, sent his coach and an invitation for him; and as he persisted in his refusal to appear again upon what is stage, what is players put another in his place, and we soon had him with us. Mr Arnold gave him the kindest reception, and I received him with my usual transport ; for I could never counterfeit false resentment. Miss Wilmot's where is p align="left" Page 114 where is p align="center" where is strong THE VICAR OF WAKEFIELD where is p align="justify" reception was mixed with seeming neglect, and yet I could perceive she acted a studied part. what is tumult in her mind seemed not yet abated: she said twenty giddy things that looked like joy, and then laughed loud at her own want of meaning. At intervals she would take a sly peep at what is glass, as if happy in what is consciousness of unresisted beauty; and often would ask questions, without giving any manner of attention to what is answers. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: The Vikar Of Wake Field (1776) books

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