Books > Old Books >The Vikar Of WakeField (1776)


Page 109

THE VICAR OF WAKEFIELD

the people without the sphere of the opulent man's influence; namely, that order of men which subsists between the very rich and the very rabble; those men who are possessed of too large fortunes to submit to the neighbouring man in power, and yet are too poor to set up for tyranny themselves. In this middle order of mankind are generally to be found all the arts, wisdom, and virtues of society. This order alone is known to be the true preserver of freedom, and may be called THE PEOPLE. Now, it may happen that this middle order of mankind may lose all its influence in a state, and its voice be in a manner drowned in that of the rabble: for if the fortune sufficient for qualifying a person at present to give his voice in state affairs be ten times less than was judged sufficient upon forming the constitution, it is evident that great numbers of the rabble will thus be introduced into the political system, and they, ever moving in the vortex of the great, will follow where greatness shall direct. In such a state, therefore, all that the middle order has left, is to preserve the prerogative and privileges of the one principal governor with the most sacred circumspection. For he divides the power of the rich, and calls off the great from falling with tenfold weight on the middle order placed beneath them. The middle order may be compared to a town of which the opulent are forming the siege, and of which the governor from without is hastening the relief. While the besiegers are in dread of an enemy over them, it is but natural to offer the townsmen the most specious terms; to flatter them with sounds, and amuse them with privileges; but if they once defeat the governor from behind, the walls of the town will be but a small defence to its inhabitants. What they may then expect, may be seen by

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE the people without what is sphere of what is opulent man's influence; namely, that order of men which subsists between what is very rich and what is very rabble; those men who are possessed of too large fortunes to submit to what is neighbouring man in power, and yet are too poor to set up for tyranny themselves. In this middle order of mankind are generally to be found all what is arts, wisdom, and virtues of society. This order alone is known to be what is true preserver of freedom, and may be called what is PEOPLE. Now, it may happen that this middle order of mankind may lose all its influence in a state, and its voice be in a manner drowned in that of what is rabble: for if what is fortune sufficient for qualifying a person at present to give his voice in state affairs be ten times less than was judged sufficient upon forming what is constitution, it is evident that great numbers of what is rabble will thus be introduced into what is political system, and they, ever moving in what is vortex of what is great, will follow where greatness shall direct. In such a state, therefore, all that what is middle order has left, is to preserve what is prerogative and privileges of what is one principal governor with what is most sacred circumspection. For he divides what is power of what is rich, and calls off what is great from falling with tenfold weight on what is middle order placed beneath them. what is middle order may be compared to a town of which what is opulent are forming what is siege, and of which what is governor from without is hastening what is relief. While what is besiegers are in dread of an enemy over them, it is but natural to offer what is townsmen what is most specious terms; to flatter them with sounds, and amuse them with privileges; but if they once defeat what is governor from behind, what is walls of what is town will be but a small defence to its inhabitants. What they may then expect, may be seen by where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The Vikar Of WakeField (1776) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 109 where is p align="center" where is strong THE VICAR OF WAKEFIELD where is p align="justify" the people without what is sphere of what is opulent man's influence; namely, that order of men which subsists between the very rich and what is very rabble; those men who are possessed of too large fortunes to submit to what is neighbouring man in power, and yet are too poor to set up for tyranny themselves. In this middle order of mankind are generally to be found all what is arts, wisdom, and virtues of society. This order alone is known to be what is true preserver of freedom, and may be called what is PEOPLE. Now, it may happen that this middle order of mankind may lose all its influence in a state, and its voice be in a manner drowned in that of the rabble: for if what is fortune sufficient for qualifying a person at present to give his voice in state affairs be ten times less than was judged sufficient upon forming what is constitution, it is evident that great numbers of what is rabble will thus be introduced into the political system, and they, ever moving in what is vortex of what is great, will follow where greatness shall direct. In such a state, therefore, all that what is middle order has left, is to preserve what is prerogative and privileges of what is one principal governor with what is most sacred circumspection. For he divides what is power of what is rich, and calls off what is great from falling with tenfold weight on what is middle order placed beneath them. what is middle order may be compared to a town of which what is opulent are forming what is siege, and of which what is governor from without is hastening what is relief. While what is besiegers are in dread of an enemy over them, it is but natural to offer what is townsmen what is most specious terms; to flatter them with sounds, and amuse them with privileges; but if they once defeat what is governor from behind, what is walls of what is town will be but a small defence to its inhabitants. What they may then expect, may be seen by where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: The Vikar Of Wake Field (1776) books

Book Pages: default , vii , viii , ix , x , xi , 001 , 002 , 003 , 004 , 006 , 007 , 008 , 009 , 011 , 012 , 013 , 014 , 015 , 016 , 017 , 018 , 019 , 020 , 021 , 022 , 023 , 024 , 025 , 026 , 028 , 029 , 030 , 031 , 032 , 033 , 034 , 035 , 036 , 037 , 038 , 039 , 040 , 041 , 042 , 043 , 044 , 045 , 046 , 047 , 048 , 049 , 050 , 051 , 052 , 053 , 054 , 055 , 056 , 057 , 058 , 060 , 061 , 062 , 063 , 064 , 065 , 066 , 067 , 068 , 069 , 070 , 071 , 072 , 073 , 074 , 075 , 076 , 077 , 078 , 079 , 080 , 081 , 082 , 083 , 084 , 085 , 086 , 087 , 088 , 090 , 091 , 092 , 093 , 094 , 095 , 096 , 097 , 098 , 099 , 100 , 101 , 102 , 103 , 105 , 106 , 107 , 108 , 109 , 110 , 111 , 112 , 113 , 115 , 116 , 117 , 118 , 119 , 120 , 121 , 122 , 123 , 124 , 125 , 126 , 127 , 128 , 129 , 130 , 132 , 133 , 134 , 135 , 136 , 137 , 138 , 139 , 140 , 142 , 143 , 144 , 145 , 146 , 147 , 148 , 149 , 150 , 151 , 153 , 154 , 155 , 156 , 157 , 159 , 160 , 161 , 162 , 163 , 165 , 166 , 167 , 168 , 169 , 170 , 171 , 172 , 173 , 174 , 175 , 176 , 177 , 178 , 179 , 180 , 181 , 182 , 183 , 184 , 185 , 186 , 188 , 189 , 190 , 191 , 192 , 193 , 194 , 195 , 196 , 197 , 198 , 199 , 200 , 201 , 202 , 203 , 204 , 205 , 206 , 207 , 208 , 209 , 210 , 211 , 212 , 213 , 214 , 215 , 216 , 217 , 219 , 220 , 221 , 222 ,