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THE VICAR OF WAKEFIELD

riches flow in from external commerce than arise from internal industry; for external commerce can only be managed to advantage by the rich, and they have also at the same time all the emoluments arising from internal industry; so that the rich, with us, have two sources of wealth, whereas the poor have but one. For this reason, wealth, in all commercial states, is found to accumulate; and all such have hitherto in time become aristocratical. Again, the very laws also of this country may contribute to the accumulation of wealth; as when, by their means, the natural ties that bind the rich and poor together are broken, and it is ordained that the rich shall only marry with the rich; or when the learned are held unqualified to serve their country as counsellors, merely from a defect of opulence, and wealth is thus made the object of a wise man's ambition: by the semeans, I say, and such means as these, riches will accumulate. Now, the possessor of accumulated wealth, when furnished with the necessaries and pleasures of life, has no other method to employ the superfluity of his fortune but in purchasing power. That is, differently speaking, in making dependants, by purchasing the liberty of the needy or the venal, of men who are willing to bear the mortification of contiguous tyranny for bread. Thus each very opulent man generally gathers round him a circle of the poorest of the people; and the polity abounding in accumulated wealth may be compared to a Cartesian system, each orb with a vortex of his own. Those, however, who are willing to move in a great man's vortex, are only such as must be slaves, the rabble of mankind, whose souls and whose education are adapted to servitude, and who know nothing of liberty except the name. But there must still be a large number of

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE riches flow in from external commerce than arise from internal industry; for external commerce can only be managed to advantage by what is rich, and they have also at what is same time all what is emoluments arising from internal industry; so that what is rich, with us, have two sources of wealth, whereas what is poor have but one. For this reason, wealth, in all commercial states, is found to accumulate; and all such have hitherto in time become aristocratical. Again, what is very laws also of this country may contribute to what is accumulation of wealth; as when, by their means, what is natural ties that bind what is rich and poor together are broken, and it is ordained that what is rich shall only marry with what is rich; or when what is learned are held unqualified to serve their country as counsellors, merely from a defect of opulence, and wealth is thus made what is object of a wise man's ambition: by what is semeans, I say, and such means as these, riches will accumulate. Now, what is possessor of accumulated wealth, when furnished with what is necessaries and pleasures of life, has no other method to employ what is superfluity of his fortune but in purchasing power. That is, differently speaking, in making dependants, by purchasing what is liberty of what is needy or what is venal, of men who are willing to bear what is mortification of contiguous tyranny for bread. Thus each very opulent man generally gathers round him a circle of what is poorest of what is people; and what is polity abounding in accumulated wealth may be compared to a Cartesian system, each orb with a vortex of his own. Those, however, who are willing to move in a great man's vortex, are only such as must be slaves, what is rabble of mankind, whose souls and whose education are adapted to servitude, and who know nothing of liberty except what is name. But there must still be a large number of where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The Vikar Of WakeField (1776) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 108 where is p align="center" where is strong THE VICAR OF WAKEFIELD where is p align="justify" riches flow in from external commerce than arise from internal industry; for external commerce can only be managed to advantage by what is rich, and they have also at what is same time all what is emoluments arising from internal industry; so that what is rich, with us, have two sources of wealth, whereas what is poor have but one. For this reason, wealth, in all commercial states, is found to accumulate; and all such have hitherto in time become aristocratical. Again, what is very laws also of this country may contribute to the accumulation of wealth; as when, by their means, what is natural ties that bind what is rich and poor together are broken, and it is ordained that what is rich shall only marry with what is rich; or when what is learned are held unqualified to serve their country as counsellors, merely from a defect of opulence, and wealth is thus made what is object of a wise man's ambition: by what is semeans, I say, and such means as these, riches will accumulate. Now, what is possessor of accumulated wealth, when furnished with what is necessaries and pleasures of life, has no other method to employ what is superfluity of his fortune but in purchasing power. That is, differently speaking, in making dependants, by purchasing what is liberty of what is needy or what is venal, of men who are willing to bear what is mortification of contiguous tyranny for bread. Thus each very opulent man generally gathers round him a circle of what is poorest of what is people; and what is polity abounding in accumulated wealth may be compared to a Cartesian system, each orb with a vortex of his own. Those, however, who are willing to move in a great man's vortex, are only such as must be slaves, what is rabble of mankind, whose souls and whose education are adapted to servitude, and who know nothing of liberty except what is name. But there must still be a large number of where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: The Vikar Of Wake Field (1776) books

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