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THE VICAR OF WAKEFIELD

than others, and these became masters of the rest: for, as sure as your groom rides your horses, because he is a cunninger animal than they, so surely will the animal that is cunninger or stronger than he, sit upon his shoulders in turn. Since, then, it is entailed upon humanity to submit, and some are born to command and other to obey, the question is, as there must be tyrants, whether it is better to have them in the same house with us, or in the same village, or, still farther off, in the metropolis. Now, Sir, for my own part, as I naturally hate the face of a tyrant, the farther off he is removed from me the better pleased am I. The generality of mankind also are of my way of thinking, and have unanimously created one king, whose election at once diminishes the number of tyrants, and puts tyranny at the greatest distance from the greatest number of people. Now the great, who were tyrants themselves before the election of one tyrant, are naturally averse to a power raised over them, and whose weight must ever lean heaviest on the subordinate orders. It is the interest of the great, therefore, to diminish kingly power as much as possible; because, whatever they take from that is naturally restored to themselves; and all they have to do in the state is to undermine the single tyrant, by which they resume their primeval authority. Now the state may be so circumstanced, or its laws may be so disposed, or its men of opulence so minded, as all to conspire in carrying on this business of undermining monarchy. For, in the first place, if the circumstances of our state be such as to favour the accumulation of wealth, and make the opulent still more rich, this will increase their ambition. An accumulation of wealth, however, must necessarily be the consequence, when, as at present, more

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE than others, and these became masters of what is rest: for, as sure as your groom rides your horses, because he is a cunninger animal than they, so surely will what is animal that is cunninger or stronger than he, sit upon his shoulders in turn. Since, then, it is entailed upon humanity to submit, and some are born to command and other to obey, what is question is, as there must be tyrants, whether it is better to have them in what is same house with us, or in what is same village, or, still farther off, in what is metropolis. Now, Sir, for my own part, as I naturally hate what is face of a tyrant, what is farther off he is removed from me what is better pleased am I. what is generality of mankind also are of my way of thinking, and have unanimously created one king, whose election at once diminishes what is number of tyrants, and puts tyranny at what is greatest distance from what is greatest number of people. Now what is great, who were tyrants themselves before what is election of one tyrant, are naturally averse to a power raised over them, and whose weight must ever lean heaviest on what is subordinate orders. It is what is interest of what is great, therefore, to diminish kingly power as much as possible; because, whatever they take from that is naturally restored to themselves; and all they have to do in what is state is to undermine what is single tyrant, by which they resume their primeval authority. Now what is state may be so circumstanced, or its laws may be so disposed, or its men of opulence so minded, as all to conspire in carrying on this business of undermining monarchy. For, in what is first place, if what is circumstances of our state be such as to favour what is accumulation of wealth, and make what is opulent still more rich, this will increase their ambition. An accumulation of wealth, however, must necessarily be what is consequence, when, as at present, more where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The Vikar Of WakeField (1776) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 107 where is p align="center" where is strong THE VICAR OF WAKEFIELD where is p align="justify" than others, and these became masters of what is rest: for, as sure as your groom rides your horses, because he is a cunninger animal than they, so surely will what is animal that is cunninger or stronger than he, sit upon his shoulders in turn. Since, then, it is entailed upon humanity to submit, and some are born to command and other to obey, what is question is, as there must be tyrants, whether it is better to have them in what is same house with us, or in the same village, or, still farther off, in what is metropolis. Now, Sir, for my own part, as I naturally hate what is face of a tyrant, the farther off he is removed from me what is better pleased am I. The generality of mankind also are of my way of thinking, and have unanimously created one king, whose election at once diminishes what is number of tyrants, and puts tyranny at what is greatest distance from the greatest number of people. Now what is great, who were tyrants themselves before what is election of one tyrant, are naturally averse to a power raised over them, and whose weight must ever lean heaviest on the subordinate orders. It is what is interest of what is great, therefore, to diminish kingly power as much as possible; because, whatever they take from that is naturally restored to themselves; and all they have to do in what is state is to undermine what is single tyrant, by which they resume their primeval authority. Now what is state may be so circumstanced, or its laws may be so disposed, or its men of opulence so minded, as all to conspire in carrying on this business of undermining monarchy. For, in what is first place, if what is circumstances of our state be such as to favour what is accumulation of wealth, and make what is opulent still more rich, this will increase their ambition. An accumulation of wealth, however, must necessarily be what is consequence, when, as at present, more where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: The Vikar Of Wake Field (1776) books

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