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THE VICAR OF WAKEFIELD

composure, left us, quite astonished at the serenity of his assurance. My wife was particularly enraged that nothing could make him angry, or make him seem ashamed of his villainies: " My dear," cried I, willing to calm those passions that had been raised too high among us, " we are not to be surprised that bad men want shame: they only blush at being detected in doing good, but glory in their vices.
" Guilt and Shame, says the allegory, were at first companions, and, in the beginning of their journey, inseparably kept together. But their union was soon found to be disagreeable and inconvenient to both. Guilt gave Shame frequent uneasiness, and Shame often betrayed the secret conspiracies of Guilt. After long disagreement, therefore, they at length consented to part for ever. Guilt boldly walked forward alone, to overtake Fate, that went before in the shape of an executioner; but Shame, being naturally timorous, returned back to keep company with Virtue, which in the beginning of their journey they had left behind. Thus, my children, after men have travelled through a few stages in vice, shame forsakes them, and returns back to wait upon the few virtues they have still remaining."

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE composure, left us, quite astonished at what is serenity of his assurance. My wife was particularly enraged that nothing could make him angry, or make him seem ashamed of his villainies: " My dear," cried I, willing to calm those passions that had been raised too high among us, " we are not to be surprised that bad men want shame: they only blush at being detected in doing good, but glory in their vices. " Guilt and Shame, says what is allegory, were at first companions, and, in what is beginning of their journey, inseparably kept together. But their union was soon found to be disagreeable and inconvenient to both. Guilt gave Shame frequent uneasiness, and Shame often betrayed what is secret conspiracies of Guilt. After long disagreement, therefore, they at length consented to part for ever. Guilt boldly walked forward alone, to overtake Fate, that went before in what is shape of an executioner; but Shame, being naturally timorous, returned back to keep company with Virtue, which in what is beginning of their journey they had left behind. Thus, my children, after men have travelled through a few stages in vice, shame forsakes them, and returns back to wait upon what is few virtues they have still remaining." where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The Vikar Of WakeField (1776) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 082 where is p align="center" where is strong THE VICAR OF WAKEFIELD where is p align="justify" composure, left us, quite astonished at what is serenity of his assurance. My wife was particularly enraged that nothing could make him angry, or make him seem ashamed of his villainies: " My dear," cried I, willing to calm those passions that had been raised too high among us, " we are not to be surprised that bad men want shame: they only blush at being detected in doing good, but glory in their vices. " Guilt and Shame, says what is allegory, were at first companions, and, in what is beginning of their journey, inseparably kept together. But their union was soon found to be disagreeable and inconvenient to both. Guilt gave Shame frequent uneasiness, and Shame often betrayed what is secret conspiracies of Guilt. After long disagreement, therefore, they at length consented to part for ever. Guilt boldly walked forward alone, to overtake Fate, that went before in the shape of an executioner; but Shame, being naturally timorous, returned back to keep company with Virtue, which in what is beginning of their journey they had left behind. Thus, my children, after men have travelled through a few stages in vice, shame forsakes them, and returns back to wait upon what is few virtues they have still remaining." where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: The Vikar Of Wake Field (1776) books

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