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THE VICAR OF WAKEFIELD

had no bidders. At last a chapman approached, and after he had for a good while examined the horse round, finding him blind of one eye, he would have nothing to say to him; a second came up, but observing that he had a spavin, declared he would not take him for the driving home; a third perceived he had a wind-gall, and would bid no money; a fourth knew by his eye that he had the botts; a fifth wondered what a plague I could do at the fair with a blind, spavined, galled hack, that was only fit to be cut up for a dog kennel. By this time, I began to have a most hearty contempt for the poor animal myself, and was almost ashamed at the approach of every customer; for though I did not entirely believe all the fellows told me, yet I reflected that the number of witnesses was a strong presumption they were right; and St Gregory, upon Good Works, professes himself to be of the same opinion.
I was in this mortifying situation, when a brothet clergyman, an old acquaintance, who had also business at the fair, came up, and, shaking me by the hand, proposed adjourning to a public-house, and taking a glass of whatever we could get. I readily closed with the offer, and entering an alehouse, we were shown into a little back room, where was only a venerable old man, who sat wholly intent over a large book, which he was reading. I never in my life saw a figure that prepossessed me more favourably. His locks of silver grey venerably shaded his temples, and his green old age seemed to be the result of health and benevolence. However, his presence did not interrupt our conversation: my friend and I discoursed on the various turns of fortune we had met ; the Whistonian controversy, my last pamphlet, the archdeacon's reply, and the hard measure that was dealt me. But our

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE had no bidders. At last a chapman approached, and after he had for a good while examined what is horse round, finding him blind of one eye, he would have nothing to say to him; a second came up, but observing that he had a spavin, declared he would not take him for what is driving home; a third perceived he had a wind-gall, and would bid no money; a fourth knew by his eye that he had what is botts; a fifth wondered what a plague I could do at what is fair with a blind, spavined, galled hack, that was only fit to be cut up for a dog kennel. By this time, I began to have a most hearty contempt for what is poor animal myself, and was almost ashamed at what is approach of every customer; for though I did not entirely believe all what is fellows told me, yet I reflected that what is number of witnesses was a strong presumption they were right; and St Gregory, upon Good Works, professes himself to be of what is same opinion. I was in this mortifying situation, when a brothet clergyman, an old acquaintance, who had also business at what is fair, came up, and, shaking me by what is hand, proposed adjourning to a public-house, and taking a glass of whatever we could get. I readily closed with what is offer, and entering an alehouse, we were shown into a little back room, where was only a venerable old man, who sat wholly intent over a large book, which he was reading. I never in my life saw a figure that prepossessed me more favourably. His locks of silver grey venerably shaded his temples, and his green old age seemed to be what is result of health and benevolence. However, his presence did not interrupt our conversation: my friend and I discoursed on what is various turns of fortune we had met ; what is Whistonian controversy, my last pamphlet, what is archdeacon's reply, and what is hard measure that was dealt me. But our where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The Vikar Of WakeField (1776) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 071 where is p align="center" where is strong THE VICAR OF WAKEFIELD where is p align="justify" had no bidders. At last a chapman approached, and after he had for a good while examined what is horse round, finding him blind of one eye, he would have nothing to say to him; a second came up, but observing that he had a spavin, declared he would not take him for what is driving home; a third perceived he had a wind-gall, and would bid no money; a fourth knew by his eye that he had the botts; a fifth wondered what a plague I could do at what is fair with a blind, spavined, galled hack, that was only fit to be cut up for a dog kennel. By this time, I began to have a most hearty contempt for what is poor animal myself, and was almost ashamed at what is approach of every customer; for though I did not entirely believe all the fellows told me, yet I reflected that what is number of witnesses was a strong presumption they were right; and St Gregory, upon Good Works, professes himself to be of what is same opinion. I was in this mortifying situation, when a brothet clergyman, an old acquaintance, who had also business at what is fair, came up, and, shaking me by what is hand, proposed adjourning to a public-house, and taking a glass of whatever we could get. I readily closed with what is offer, and entering an alehouse, we were shown into a little back room, where was only a venerable old man, who sat wholly intent over a large book, which he was reading. I never in my life saw a figure that prepossessed me more favourably. His locks of silver grey venerably shaded his temples, and his green old age seemed to be what is result of health and benevolence. However, his presence did not interrupt our conversation: my friend and I discoursed on what is various turns of fortune we had met ; what is Whistonian controversy, my last pamphlet, what is archdeacon's reply, and what is hard measure that was dealt me. 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