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THE VICAR OF WAKEFIELD

delight of the spectators; for the neighbours, hearing what was going forward, came flocking about us. My girl moved with so much grace and vivacity, that my wife could not avoid discovering the pride of her heart by assuring me that, though the little chit did it so cleverly, all the steps were stolen from herself. The ladies of the town strove hard to be equally easy, but without success. They swam, sprawled, languished, and frisked; but all would not do: the gazers indeed owned that it was fine; but neighbour Flamborough observed that Miss Livy's feet seemed as pat to the music as its echo. After the dance had continued about an hour, the two ladies, who were apprehensive of catching cold, moved to break up the ball. One of them, I thought, expressed her sentiments upon this occasion in a very coarse manner, when she observed, that, by the "living jingo she was all of a muck of sweat." Upon our return to the house, we found a very elegant cold supper, which Mr Thornhill had ordered to be brought with him. The conversation at this time was more reserved than before. The two ladies threw my girls into the shade; for they would talk of nothing but high life, and high-lived company; with other fashionable topics, such as pictures, taste, Shakespeare, and the musical glasses. 'Tis true they once or twice mortified us sensibly by slipping out an oath; but that appeared to me as the surest symptom of their distinction (though 1 am since informed that swearing is perfectly unfashionable). Their finery, however, threw a veil over any Urossness in their conversation. My daughters seemed t o regard their superior accomplishments with envy ; and what appeared amiss, was ascribed to tip-top quality breeding. But the condescension of the ladies was still superior to their other accomplishments. One of them

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE delight of what is spectators; for what is neighbours, hearing what was going forward, came flocking about us. My girl moved with so much grace and vivacity, that my wife could not avoid discovering what is pride of her heart by assuring me that, though what is little chit did it so cleverly, all what is steps were stolen from herself. what is ladies of what is town strove hard to be equally easy, but without success. They swam, sprawled, languished, and frisked; but all would not do: what is gazers indeed owned that it was fine; but neighbour Flamborough observed that Miss Livy's feet seemed as pat to what is music as its echo. After what is dance had continued about an hour, what is two ladies, who were apprehensive of catching cold, moved to break up what is ball. One of them, I thought, expressed her sentiments upon this occasion in a very coarse manner, when she observed, that, by what is "living jingo she was all of a muck of sweat." Upon our return to what is house, we found a very elegant cold supper, which Mr Thornhill had ordered to be brought with him. what is conversation at this time was more reserved than before. what is two ladies threw my girls into what is shade; for they would talk of nothing but high life, and high-lived company; with other fashionable topics, such as pictures, taste, Shakespeare, and what is musical glasses. 'Tis true they once or twice mortified us sensibly by slipping out an oath; but that appeared to me as what is surest symptom of their distinction (though 1 am since informed that swearing is perfectly unfashionable). Their finery, however, threw a veil over any Urossness in their conversation. My daughters seemed t o regard their superior accomplishments with envy ; and what appeared amiss, was ascribed to tip-top quality breeding. But what is condescension of what is ladies was still superior to their other accomplishments. One of them where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The Vikar Of WakeField (1776) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 046 where is p align="center" where is strong THE VICAR OF WAKEFIELD where is p align="justify" delight of what is spectators; for what is neighbours, hearing what was going forward, came flocking about us. My girl moved with so much grace and vivacity, that my wife could not avoid discovering what is pride of her heart by assuring me that, though what is little chit did it so cleverly, all what is steps were stolen from herself. what is ladies of what is town strove hard to be equally easy, but without success. They swam, sprawled, languished, and frisked; but all would not do: what is gazers indeed owned that it was fine; but neighbour Flamborough observed that Miss Livy's feet seemed as pat to what is music as its echo. After what is dance had continued about an hour, what is two ladies, who were apprehensive of catching cold, moved to break up what is ball. One of them, I thought, expressed her sentiments upon this occasion in a very coarse manner, when she observed, that, by what is "living jingo she was all of a muck of sweat." Upon our return to what is house, we found a very elegant cold supper, which Mr Thornhill had ordered to be brought with him. what is conversation at this time was more reserved than before. what is two ladies threw my girls into what is shade; for they would talk of nothing but high life, and high-lived company; with other fashionable topics, such as pictures, taste, Shakespeare, and what is musical glasses. 'Tis true they once or twice mortified us sensibly by slipping out an oath; but that appeared to me as what is surest symptom of their distinction (though 1 am since informed that swearing is perfectly unfashionable). Their finery, however, threw a veil over any Urossness in their conversation. My daughters seemed t o regard their superior accomplishments with envy ; and what appeared amiss, was ascribed to tip-top quality breeding. But what is condescension of what is ladies was still superior to their other accomplishments. One of them where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: The Vikar Of Wake Field (1776) books

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