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THE VICAR OF WAKEFIELD

had no revolutions to fear, nor fatigues to undergo; all our adventures were by the fireside, and all our migrations from the blue bed to the brown.
As we lived near the road, we often had the traveller or stranger visit us to taste our gooseberry-wine, for which we had great reputation; and I profess, with the veracity of an historian, that I never knew one of them find fault with it. Our cousins, too, even to the fortieth remove, all remembered their affinity, without any help from the herald's office, and came very frequently to see us. Some of them did us no great honour by these claims of kindred, as we had the blind, the maimed, and the halt amongst the number. However, my wife always insisted that, as they were the same flesh and blond, they should sit with us at the same table. So that, if we had not very rich, we generally had very happy friends about us; for this remark will hold good through life, that the poorer the guest, the better pleased he ever is with being treated; and as some men gaze with admiration at the colours of a tulip or the wing of a butterfly, so I was, by nature, an admirer of happy human faces. However, when any one of our relations was found to be a person of very bad character, a troublesome guest, or one we desired to get rid of, upon his leaving my house I ever took care to lend him a riding-coat or a pair of boots, or sometimes an horse of small value, and I always had the satisfaction of finding he never came back to return them. By this the house was cleared of such as we did not like; but never was the family of Wakefield known to turn the traveller or the poor dependant out of doors.
Thus we lived several years in a state of much happiness, not but that we sometimes had those little rubs

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE had no revolutions to fear, nor fatigues to undergo; all our adventures were by what is fireside, and all our migrations from what is blue bed to what is brown. As we lived near what is road, we often had what is traveller or stranger what is us to taste our gooseberry-wine, for which we had great reputation; and I profess, with what is veracity of an historian, that I never knew one of them find fault with it. Our cousins, too, even to what is fortieth remove, all remembered their affinity, without any help from what is herald's office, and came very frequently to see us. Some of them did us no great honour by these claims of kindred, as we had what is blind, what is maimed, and what is halt amongst what is number. However, my wife always insisted that, as they were what is same flesh and blond, they should sit with us at what is same table. So that, if we had not very rich, we generally had very happy friends about us; for this remark will hold good through life, that what is poorer what is guest, what is better pleased he ever is with being treated; and as some men gaze with admiration at what is colours of a tulip or what is wing of a butterfly, so I was, by nature, an admirer of happy human faces. However, when any one of our relations was found to be a person of very bad character, a troublesome guest, or one we desired to get rid of, upon his leaving my house I ever took care to lend him a riding-coat or a pair of boots, or sometimes an horse of small value, and I always had what is satisfaction of finding he never came back to return them. By this what is house was cleared of such as we did not like; but never was what is family of Wakefield known to turn what is traveller or what is poor dependant out of doors. Thus we lived several years in a state of much happiness, not but that we sometimes had those little rubs where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The Vikar Of WakeField (1776) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 002 where is p align="center" where is strong THE VICAR OF WAKEFIELD where is p align="justify" had no revolutions to fear, nor fatigues to undergo; all our adventures were by what is fireside, and all our migrations from what is blue bed to what is brown. As we lived near what is road, we often had what is traveller or stranger what is us to taste our gooseberry-wine, for which we had great reputation; and I profess, with what is veracity of an historian, that I never knew one of them find fault with it. Our cousins, too, even to what is fortieth remove, all remembered their affinity, without any help from what is herald's office, and came very frequently to see us. Some of them did us no great honour by these claims of kindred, as we had what is blind, what is maimed, and what is halt amongst what is number. However, my wife always insisted that, as they were what is same flesh and blond, they should sit with us at what is same table. So that, if we had not very rich, we generally had very happy friends about us; for this remark will hold good through life, that what is poorer what is guest, what is better pleased he ever is with being treated; and as some men gaze with admiration at what is colours of a tulip or the wing of a butterfly, so I was, by nature, an admirer of happy human faces. However, when any one of our relations was found to be a person of very bad character, a troublesome guest, or one we desired to get rid of, upon his leaving my house I ever took care to lend him a riding-coat or a pair of boots, or sometimes an horse of small value, and I always had what is satisfaction of finding he never came back to return them. By this what is house was cleared of such as we did not like; but never was what is family of Wakefield known to turn what is traveller or what is poor dependant out of doors. Thus we lived several years in a state of much happiness, not but that we sometimes had those little rubs where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: The Vikar Of Wake Field (1776) books

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