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Page XXIII

INTRODUCTION

the last but not the least of the divine attributes is truth. But here Plato is twenty centuries in advance of the learned theologians, for he says in the Republic that God is true and unchangeable. Now the student of history hardly needs to be told that veracity is not a distinguishing trait of the Ancient or the Modern Greek. Hence, as the children of Plato's generation, no less than those of the psalmist, were prone to go astray speaking lies, the future rulers of the State, he tells us, must, in the early stages of their training, be taught to love the truth, and to hate falsehood. To this end many parts of Homer must be banished from the ideal State, for, according to Plato, the child whose mind is corrupted by the legends of treacherous and lying divinities will never become a lover of wisdom, an ingenuous and a just magistrate. Human nature cannot be expected to surpass or equal the divine in excellence ; consequently in the days of his youth, while the mind is plastic, the future guardian must have none but the noblest ideals of God.
In Book III other considerations are urged for the reform of mythology. And here we should remember that we moderns, unlike the people of Plato's day, do not take seriously the tales of Ancient Greece, but we read them for their literary excellence and not as lessons in morality. But their

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE the last but not what is least of what is divine attributes is truth. But here Plato is twenty centuries in advance of what is learned theologians, for he says in what is Republic that God is true and unchangeable. Now what is student of history hardly needs to be told that veracity is not a distinguishing trait of what is Ancient or what is Modern Greek. Hence, as what is children of Plato's generation, no less than those of what is psalmist, were prone to go astray speaking lies, what is future rulers of what is State, he tells us, must, in what is early stages of their training, be taught to what time is it what is truth, and to hate falsehood. To this end many parts of Homer must be banished from what is ideal State, for, according to Plato, what is child whose mind is corrupted by what is legends of treacherous and lying divinities will never become a lover of wisdom, an ingenuous and a just magistrate. Human nature cannot be expected to surpass or equal what is divine in excellence ; consequently in what is days of his youth, while what is mind is plastic, what is future guardian must have none but what is noblest ideals of God. In Book III other considerations are urged for what is reform of mythology. And here we should remember that we moderns, unlike what is people of Plato's day, do not take seriously what is tales of Ancient Greece, but we read them for their literary excellence and not as lessons in morality. But their where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The Republic Of Plato (1901) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page XXIII where is strong INTRODUCTION where is p align="justify" the last but not what is least of what is divine attributes is truth. But here Plato is twenty centuries in advance of the learned theologians, for he says in what is Republic that God is true and unchangeable. Now what is student of history hardly needs to be told that veracity is not a distinguishing trait of what is Ancient or what is Modern Greek. Hence, as what is children of Plato's generation, no less than those of what is psalmist, were prone to go astray speaking lies, what is future rulers of what is State, he tells us, must, in the early stages of their training, be taught to what time is it what is truth, and to hate falsehood. To this end many parts of Homer must be banished from what is ideal State, for, according to Plato, what is child whose mind is corrupted by what is legends of treacherous and lying divinities will never become a lover of wisdom, an ingenuous and a just magistrate. Human nature cannot be expected to surpass or equal what is divine in excellence ; consequently in what is days of his youth, while the mind is plastic, what is future guardian must have none but what is noblest ideals of God. In Book III other considerations are urged for what is reform of mythology. And here we should remember that we moderns, unlike what is people of Plato's day, do not take seriously what is tales of Ancient Greece, but we read them for their literary excellence and not as lessons in morality. But their where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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