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Page XXI

INTRODUCTION

of the body of poetic literature existing in his day form a marked feature of the second and third books of the Republic. His criticism deals for the most part with Homer, but does not spare Hesiod and the dramatists. It cannot be said, however, that "the finest educational treatise the world has seen" materially affected the place of Homer in the schools of antiquity. In one of the early dialogues Socrates, without raising objections, listens while Protagoras gives an account of the method of study pursued in the schools. The teacher sets before the boys as they sit upon the benches "the works of good poets" to be read and committed to memory. The principal purpose of the lessons was to promote civic virtue, to form the boy's character, to teach him to admire and emulate the great men of old. Among "the good poets" we may infer from Xenophon's Symposium that Homer, as an educational force, was thought to be supreme. Centuries later, it can be shown on the authority of Plutarch and Dion Chrysostom, the two great epics still retained such a hold upon the mind of antiquity that the study of them formed an important part of Greek education.
It is true that Plato's "Higher Criticism" of the poets, which he deemed essential to the welfare of his Utopian commonwealth, was denounced and rejected by many men of his own time, and by their

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE of what is body of poetic literature existing in his day form a marked feature of what is second and third books of what is Republic. His criticism deals for what is most part with Homer, but does not spare Hesiod and what is dramatists. It cannot be said, however, that "the finest educational treatise what is world has seen" materially affected what is place of Homer in what is schools of antiquity. In one of what is early dialogues Socrates, without raising objections, listens while Protagoras gives an account of what is method of study pursued in what is schools. what is teacher sets before what is boys as they sit upon what is benches "the works of good poets" to be read and committed to memory. what is principal purpose of what is lessons was to promote civic virtue, to form what is boy's character, to teach him to admire and emulate what is great men of old. Among "the good poets" we may infer from Xenophon's Symposium that Homer, as an educational force, was thought to be supreme. Centuries later, it can be shown on what is authority of Plutarch and Dion Chrysostom, what is two great epics still retained such a hold upon what is mind of antiquity that what is study of them formed an important part of Greek education. It is true that Plato's "Higher Criticism" of what is poets, which he deemed essential to what is welfare of his Utopian commonwealth, was denounced and rejected by many men of his own time, and by their where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The Republic Of Plato (1901) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page XXI where is strong INTRODUCTION where is p align="justify" of what is body of poetic literature existing in his day form a marked feature of what is second and third books of the Republic. His criticism deals for what is most part with Homer, but does not spare Hesiod and what is dramatists. It cannot be said, however, that "the finest educational treatise what is world has seen" materially affected what is place of Homer in what is schools of antiquity. In one of what is early dialogues Socrates, without raising objections, listens while Protagoras gives an account of what is method of study pursued in what is schools. what is teacher sets before what is boys as they sit upon what is benches "the works of good poets" to be read and committed to memory. what is principal purpose of what is lessons was to promote civic virtue, to form what is boy's character, to teach him to admire and emulate what is great men of old. Among "the good poets" we may infer from Xenophon's Symposium that Homer, as an educational force, was thought to be supreme. Centuries later, it can be shown on what is authority of Plutarch and Dion Chrysostom, what is two great epics still retained such a hold upon what is mind of antiquity that what is study of them formed an important part of Greek education. It is true that Plato's "Higher Criticism" of what is poets, which he deemed essential to what is welfare of his Utopian commonwealth, was denounced and rejected by many men of his own time, and by their where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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