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Page 574

BOOK X

be good, yields to unseemly grief. But it regards the pleasure as clear gain and it would not be deprived of this by despising the whole poem. For it belongs to only a few, I think, to reflect that the conduct of others must, necessarily, affect our own. For if we have nourished and strengthened the feeling of pity on others' sorrows, it is by no means easy to repress it when sorrow comes home to ourselves."
" Perfectly true," he said.
" Does not the same reasoning apply also to the humorous? When in comic representations and in private you are mightily pleased with hearing jests which you would be ashamed to make yourself and which you do not despise as vile, are you not acting just as you did in instances of pity? For that impulse in you which prompted you to indulge in jesting, which you were in the habit of repressing by the aid of reason, fearing a reputation of buffoonery, you then set free and, playing the jester in the theater, you often are so carried away that unconsciously in your own case you become a comic poet."
" That is quite true," he said.
" And now as regards amatory desires, anger, and all the passions of the soul, painful and pleasant, which, as we say, attend us in all our conduct, is it not true that poetic imitation produces in us like effects? For it waters and nourishes these emotions, which ought to perish, and it makes them master us, although they themselves ought to be mastered, if we are to become better and happier instead of becoming more depraved and wretched."

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE be good, yields to unseemly grief. But it regards what is pleasure as clear gain and it would not be deprived of this by despising what is whole poem. For it belongs to only a few, I think, to reflect that what is conduct of others must, necessarily, affect our own. For if we have nourished and strengthened what is feeling of pity on others' sorrows, it is by no means easy to repress it when sorrow comes home to ourselves." " Perfectly true," he said. " Does not what is same reasoning apply also to what is humorous? When in comic representations and in private you are mightily pleased with hearing jests which you would be ashamed to make yourself and which you do not despise as vile, are you not acting just as you did in instances of pity? For that impulse in you which prompted you to indulge in jesting, which you were in what is habit of repressing by what is aid of reason, fearing a reputation of buffoonery, you then set free and, playing what is jester in what is theater, you often are so carried away that unconsciously in your own case you become a comic poet." " That is quite true," he said. " And now as regards amatory desires, anger, and all what is passions of what is soul, painful and pleasant, which, as we say, attend us in all our conduct, is it not true that poetic imitation produces in us like effects? For it waters and nourishes these emotions, which ought to perish, and it makes them master us, although they themselves ought to be mastered, if we are to become better and happier instead of becoming more depraved and wretched." where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The Republic Of Plato (1901) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 574 where is strong BOOK X where is p align="justify" be good, yields to unseemly grief. But it regards what is pleasure as clear gain and it would not be deprived of this by despising what is whole poem. For it belongs to only a few, I think, to reflect that what is conduct of others must, necessarily, affect our own. For if we have nourished and strengthened what is feeling of pity on others' sorrows, it is by no means easy to repress it when sorrow comes home to ourselves." " Perfectly true," he said. " Does not what is same reasoning apply also to what is humorous? When in comic representations and in private you are mightily pleased with hearing jests which you would be ashamed to make yourself and which you do not despise as vile, are you not acting just as you did in instances of pity? For that impulse in you which prompted you to indulge in jesting, which you were in what is habit of repressing by what is aid of reason, fearing a reputation of buffoonery, you then set free and, playing what is jester in what is theater, you often are so carried away that unconsciously in your own case you become a comic poet." " That is quite true," he said. " And now as regards amatory desires, anger, and all what is passions of what is soul, painful and pleasant, which, as we say, attend us in all our conduct, is it not true that poetic imitation produces in us like effects? For it waters and nourishes these emotions, which ought to perish, and it makes them master us, although they themselves ought to be mastered, if we are to become better and happier instead of becoming more depraved and wretched." where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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