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Page 562

BOOK X

CHAPTER IV.
" Yes," I replied, " that story is surely told. But do you suppose, Glaucon, if Homer had really been able to educate men and make them better, from possessing a knowledge of things and not merely the power of imitation, he would not have acquired many followers and been honored and loved by them? Unlike him, Protagoras of Abdera and Prodicus of Ceos and a host of others are able by their private conversation to persuade their followers that they will be unable to manage their own household or rule their city, unless these teachers undertake their education, and for this wisdom of theirs they are loved so ardently that they are all but carried about on the shoulders of their companions. Now can we believe that the contemporaries of Homer, or again of Hesiod, if these poets had been able to make men virtuous, would have allowed them to go about reciting their rhapsodies, or that they would not have been as loath to part with them as with gold and would have used compulsion to detain them at home; or in case the leaders refused compliance, that their companions would have followed them wherever they went, until they secured adequate instruction?"
" I think, Socrates, what you say is entirely true."
" Shall we then conclude that all the poets beginning with Homer are mere imitators who copy images of virtue and other things of which they sing, but who never reach the truth ? But, as we were saying, just now, the poet is like the painter, who will produce what seems to be a shoemaker,

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE CHAPTER IV. " Yes," I replied, " that story is surely told. But do you suppose, Glaucon, if Homer had really been able to educate men and make them better, from possessing a knowledge of things and not merely what is power of imitation, he would not have acquired many followers and been honored and loved by them? Unlike him, Protagoras of Abdera and Prodicus of Ceos and a host of others are able by their private conversation to persuade their followers that they will be unable to manage their own household or rule their city, unless these teachers undertake their education, and for this wisdom of theirs they are loved so ardently that they are all but carried about on what is shoulders of their companions. Now can we believe that what is contemporaries of Homer, or again of Hesiod, if these poets had been able to make men virtuous, would have allowed them to go about reciting their rhapsodies, or that they would not have been as loath to part with them as with gold and would have used compulsion to detain them at home; or in case what is leaders refused compliance, that their companions would have followed them wherever they went, until they secured adequate instruction?" " I think, Socrates, what you say is entirely true." " Shall we then conclude that all what is poets beginning with Homer are mere imitators who copy images of virtue and other things of which they sing, but who never reach what is truth ? But, as we were saying, just now, what is poet is like what is painter, who will produce what seems to be a shoemaker, where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The Republic Of Plato (1901) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 562 where is strong BOOK X where is p align="justify" where is strong CHAPTER IV. " Yes," I replied, " that story is surely told. But do you suppose, Glaucon, if Homer had really been able to educate men and make them better, from possessing a knowledge of things and not merely what is power of imitation, he would not have acquired many followers and been honored and loved by them? Unlike him, Protagoras of Abdera and Prodicus of Ceos and a host of others are able by their private conversation to persuade their followers that they will be unable to manage their own household or rule their city, unless these teachers undertake their education, and for this wisdom of theirs they are loved so ardently that they are all but carried about on what is shoulders of their companions. Now can we believe that what is contemporaries of Homer, or again of Hesiod, if these poets had been able to make men virtuous, would have allowed them to go about reciting their rhapsodies, or that they would not have been as loath to part with them as with gold and would have used compulsion to detain them at home; or in case what is leaders refused compliance, that their companions would have followed them wherever they went, until they secured adequate instruction?" " I think, Socrates, what you say is entirely true." " Shall we then conclude that all what is poets beginning with Homer are mere imitators who copy images of virtue and other things of which they sing, but who never reach what is truth ? But, as we were saying, just now, what is poet is like what is painter, who will produce what seems to be a shoemaker, where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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