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Page 559

BOOK X

CHAPTER III
" Well," said I, " we have now to consider tragedy and Homer, the father of tragedy, since we constantly hear it said by certain people that the dramatic poets know all arts and all things human that relate to virtue and vice and things divine as well. For the good poet, they tell us, if he is to make a beautiful poem on his subject, must compose with a knowledge of that subject, otherwise he cannot possibly succeed. We must therefore consider whether these men whom our informants have met are imitators, by whom they have been deceived and, on seeing their works, fail to perceive that these productions are thrice removed from reality and easily composed by one who is ignorant of the truth, because their poems are only phantasms and not realities; or after all our informants may be right and the good poets really understand the subjects about which they seem to the multitude to speak so well."
" We must certainly," he said, " examine the matter carefully."
" Now do you suppose that if anyone were able to produce the original as well as the image, he would choose to devote himself seriously to the making of images and to place this before him as the purpose of his life because he considers it the noblest aim? "
" I, at least, do not think so."
" But, I imagine, if he had also a real knowledge of the things which he imitates, he would be more intent by far upon realities than upon imitations and would be eager to leave behind him works many and

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE CHAPTER III " Well," said I, " we have now to consider tragedy and Homer, what is father of tragedy, since we constantly hear it said by certain people that what is dramatic poets know all arts and all things human that relate to virtue and vice and things divine as well. For what is good poet, they tell us, if he is to make a beautiful poem on his subject, must compose with a knowledge of that subject, otherwise he cannot possibly succeed. We must therefore consider whether these men whom our informants have met are imitators, by whom they have been deceived and, on seeing their works, fail to perceive that these productions are thrice removed from reality and easily composed by one who is ignorant of what is truth, because their poems are only phantasms and not realities; or after all our informants may be right and what is good poets really understand what is subjects about which they seem to what is multitude to speak so well." " We must certainly," he said, " examine what is matter carefully." " Now do you suppose that if anyone were able to produce what is original as well as what is image, he would choose to devote himself seriously to what is making of images and to place this before him as what is purpose of his life because he considers it what is noblest aim? " " I, at least, do not think so." " But, I imagine, if he had also a real knowledge of what is things which he imitates, he would be more intent by far upon realities than upon imitations and would be eager to leave behind him works many and where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The Republic Of Plato (1901) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 559 where is strong BOOK X where is p align="justify" where is strong CHAPTER III " Well," said I, " we have now to consider tragedy and Homer, what is father of tragedy, since we constantly hear it said by certain people that what is dramatic poets know all arts and all things human that relate to virtue and vice and things divine as well. For what is good poet, they tell us, if he is to make a beautiful poem on his subject, must compose with a knowledge of that subject, otherwise he cannot possibly succeed. We must therefore consider whether these men whom our informants have met are imitators, by whom they have been deceived and, on seeing their works, fail to perceive that these productions are thrice removed from reality and easily composed by one who is ignorant of what is truth, because their poems are only phantasms and not realities; or after all our informants may be right and what is good poets really understand what is subjects about which they seem to what is multitude to speak so well." " We must certainly," he said, " examine what is matter carefully." " Now do you suppose that if anyone were able to produce what is original as well as what is image, he would choose to devote himself seriously to what is making of images and to place this before him as what is purpose of his life because he considers it what is noblest aim? " " I, at least, do not think so." " But, I imagine, if he had also a real knowledge of what is things which he imitates, he would be more intent by far upon realities than upon imitations and would be eager to leave behind him works many and where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

Book Pages: default , v , vi , vii , viii , ix , x , xi , xii , xiii , xiv , xv , xvi , xvii , xviii , xix , xx , xxi , xxii , xxiii , xxiv , xxv , xxvi , xxvii , xxviii , xxix , xxx , xxxi , xxxii , xxxiii , xxxiv 001 , 002 , 003 , 004 , 005 , 006 , 007 , 008 , 009 , 010 , 011 , 012 , 013 , 014 , 015 , 016 , 017 , 018 , 019 , 020 , 021 , 022 , 023 , 024 , 025 , 026 , 027 , 028 , 029 , 030 , 031 , 032 , 033 , 034 , 035 , 036 , 037 , 038 , 039 , 040 , 041 , 042 , 043 , 044 , 045 , 046 , 047 , 048 , 049 , 050 , 051 , 052 , 053 , 054 , 055 , 056 , 057 , 058 , 059 , 063 , 064 , 065 , 066 , 067 , 068 , 069 , 070 , 071 , 072 , 073 , 074 , 075 , 076 , 077 , 078 , 079 , 080 , 081 , 082 , 083 , 084 , 085 , 086 , 087 , 088 , 089 , 090 , 091 , 092 , 093 , 094 , 095 , 096 , 097 , 098 , 099 , 100 , 101 , 102 , 103 , 104 , 105 , 106 , 107 , 108 , 109 , 110 , 111 , 112 , 113 , 114 , 115 , 116 , 119 , 120 , 121 , 122 , 123 , 124 , 125 , 126 , 127 , 128 , 129 , 130 , 131 , 132 , 133 , 134 , 135 , 136 , 137 , 138 , 139 , 140 , 141 , 142 , 143 , 144 , 145 , 146 , 147 , 148 , 149 , 150 , 151 , 152 , 153 , 154 , 155 , 156 , 157 , 158 , 159 , 160 , 161 , 162 , 163 , 164 , 165 , 166 , 167 , 168 , 169 , 170 , 171 , 172 , 173 , 174 , 175 , 176 , 177 , 178 , 179 , 180 , 181 , 182 , 183 , 184 , 187 , 188 , 189 , 190 , 191 , 192 , 193 , 194 , 195 , 196 , 197 , 198 , 199 , 200 , 201 , 202 , 203 , 204 , 205 , 206 , 207 , 208 , 209 , 210 , 211 , 212 , 213 , 214 , 215 , 216 , 217 , 218 , 219 , 220 , 221 , 222 , 223 , 224 , 225 , 226 , 227 , 228 , 229 , 230 , 231 , 232 , 233 , 234 , 235 , 236 , 237 , 238 , 239 , 240 , 241 , 242 , 243 , 244 , 249 , 250 , 251 , 252 , 253 , 254 , 255 , 256 , 257 , 258 , 259 , 260 , 261 , 262 , 263 , 264 , 265 , 266 , 267 , 268 , 269 , 270 , 271 , 272 , 273 , 274 , 275 , 276 , 277 , 278 , 279 , 280 , 281 , 282 , 283 , 284 , 285 , 286 , 287 , 288 , 289 , 290 , 291 , 292 , 293 , 294 , 295 , 296 , 297 , 298 , 299 , 300 , 301 , 302 , 303 , 304 , 305 , 306 , 307 , 308 , 309 , 310 , 311 , 312 , 313 , 314 , 315 , 316 , 317 , 318 , 319 , 323 , 324 , 325 , 326 , 327 , 328 , 329 , 330 , 331 , 332 , 333 , 334 , 335 , 336 , 337 , 338 , 339 , 340 , 341 , 342 , 343 , 344 , 345 , 346 , 347 , 348 , 349 , 350 , 351 , 352 , 353 , 354 , 355 , 356 , 357 , 358 , 359 , 360 , 361 , 362 , 363 , 364 , 365 , 366 , 367 , 368 , 369 , 370 , 371 , 372 , 373 , 374 , 375 , 376 , 377 , 378 , 379 , 380 , 385 , 386 , 387 , 388 , 389 , 390 , 391 , 392 , 393 , 394 , 395 , 396 , 397 , 398 , 399 , 400 , 401 , 402 , 403 , 404 , 405 , 406 , 407 , 408 , 409 , 410 , 411 , 412 , 413 , 414 , 415 , 416 , 417 , 418 , 419 , 420 , 421 , 422 , 423 , 424 , 425 , 426 , 427 , 428 , 429 , 430 , 431 , 432 , 433 , 434 , 435 , 436 , 437 , 438 , 439 , 440 , 441 , 445 , 446 , 447 , 448 , 449 , 450 , 451 , 452 , 453 , 454 , 455 , 456 , 457 , 458 , 459 , 460 , 461 , 462 , 463 , 464 , 465 , 466 , 467 , 468 , 469 , 470 , 471 , 472 , 473 , 474 , 475 , 476 , 477 , 478 , 479 , 480 , 481 , 482 , 483 , 484 , 485 , 486 , 487 , 488 , 489 , 490 , 491 , 492 , 493 , 494 , 495 , 496 , 497 , 498 , 499 , 500 , 505 , 506 , 507 , 508 , 509 , 510 , 511 , 512 , 513 , 514 , 515 , 516 , 517 , 518 , 519 , 520 , 521 , 522 , 523 , 524 , 525 , 526 , 527 , 528 , 529 , 530 , 531 , 532 , 533 , 534 , 535 , 536 , 537 , 538 , 539 , 540 , 541 , 542 , 543 , 544 , 545 , 546 , 547 , 551 , 552 , 553 , 554 , 555 , 556 , 557 , 558 , 559 , 560 , 561 , 562 , 563 , 564 , 565 , 566 , 567 , 568 , 569 , 570 , 571 , 572 , 573 , 574 , 575 , 576 , 577 , 578 , 579 , 580 , 581 , 582 , 583 , 584 , 585 , 586 , 587 , 588 , 589 , 590 , 591 , 592 , 593 , 594 , 595 , 596 , 597 , 598 , 599 ,