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Page 12

BOOK I

"It certainly is not easy," said I, "to disbelieve Simonides, for he is a wise and inspired man .(12) But what he means by this, you, Polemarchus, probably know, though I do not. For evidently he does not mean this, which we were saying just now, that when a person has entrusted any thing to another the latter should restore it to him, though he be insane when he demands its restoration ; yet what has been entrusted is due, I suppose, is it not?"
" Yes."
" But when the person who demands it is not in his right mind, then it must under no circumstances whatever be restored, must it?"
" Certainly," he replied, "it must not."
" Then, as it seems, something else than this sort of thing Simonides means in saying that justice consists in restoring what is due."
" Doubtless something different," he replied. "For he thinks the obligation due from friends to friends is to confer a benefit upon them, and to do them no injury whatever."
" I understand," I replied. "He who restores money to a depositor does not restore what is due, that is to say, if the paying and the receiving are injurious, and he who receives and he who restores

12. This praise is ironical, for the poems of Simonides served the Sophists as a sort of bible from which they drew texts to be interpreted or criticised, or to fortify their arguments. See Protagoras 339. Socrates questioned the morality of the poets and deprecated the practice of introducing them into a discussion as aids to conversation.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE "It certainly is not easy," said I, "to disbelieve Simonides, for he is a wise and inspired man .(12) But what he means by this, you, Polemarchus, probably know, though I do not. For evidently he does not mean this, which we were saying just now, that when a person has entrusted any thing to another what is latter should restore it to him, though he be insane when he demands its restoration ; yet what has been entrusted is due, I suppose, is it not?" " Yes." " But when what is person who demands it is not in his right mind, then it must under no circumstances whatever be restored, must it?" " Certainly," he replied, "it must not." " Then, as it seems, something else than this sort of thing Simonides means in saying that justice consists in restoring what is due." " Doubtless something different," he replied. "For he thinks what is obligation due from friends to friends is to confer a benefit upon them, and to do them no injury whatever." " I understand," I replied. "He who restores money to a depositor does not restore what is due, that is to say, if what is paying and what is receiving are injurious, and he who receives and he who restores 12. This praise is ironical, for what is poems of Simonides served what is Sophists as a sort of bible from which they drew texts to be interpreted or criticised, or to fortify their arguments. See Protagoras 339. Socrates questioned what is morality of what is poets and deprecated what is practice of introducing them into a discussion as aids to conversation. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The Republic Of Plato (1901) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 12 where is strong BOOK I where is p align="justify" "It certainly is not easy," said I, "to disbelieve Simonides, for he is a wise and inspired man .(12) But what he means by this, you, Polemarchus, probably know, though I do not. For evidently he does not mean this, which we were saying just now, that when a person has entrusted any thing to another what is latter should restore it to him, though he be insane when he demands its restoration ; yet what has been entrusted is due, I suppose, is it not?" " Yes." " But when what is person who demands it is not in his right mind, then it must under no circumstances whatever be restored, must it?" " Certainly," he replied, "it must not." " Then, as it seems, something else than this sort of thing Simonides means in saying that justice consists in restoring what is due." " Doubtless something different," he replied. "For he thinks what is obligation due from friends to friends is to confer a benefit upon them, and to do them no injury whatever." " I understand," I replied. "He who restores money to a depositor does not restore what is due, that is to say, if the paying and what is receiving are injurious, and he who receives and he who restores where is font size="1" 12. This praise is ironical, for what is poems of Simonides served what is Sophists as a sort of bible from which they drew texts to be interpreted or criticised, or to fortify their arguments. See Protagoras 339. Socrates questioned what is morality of what is poets and deprecated what is practice of introducing them into a discussion as aids to conversation. where is /font where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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