Books > Old Books > The Republic Of Plato (1901)


Page 10

BOOK I

may be, he is full of suspicion and dread, and now sets himself to reckon up and consider whether he has ever wronged any one. He, therefore, who finds in his own life many acts of injustice, starts up frequently from his dreams like children, is filled with alarm, and lives with a fearful expectation of what is to come; but if a man is conscious of having done no wrong to others, Hope is always present to soothe him, and to be his gentle nurse in old age, as Pindar says. For this, Socrates, was a beautiful saying of his, that when a man has led a just and holy life, sweet Hope cheering his heart, the nurse of age, is his companiori,-Hope, who more than aught else governs the wavering mind of mortal men.(11) There is indeed a wonderful truth in these words of his. Now this it is, in consideration of which I regard the possession of riches to be of chief value, not to every man indeed, but to the good man. For as regards the power of keeping ourselves free from fraud and deceit practised even involuntarily upon others, and in respect to our departing to the other world without fear because we do not owe sacrifices to a god or money to men-I say, it is to this end that the possession of wealth in great measure contributes. And it has many other uses besides ; but comparing one thing with another I, for my part, Socrates, would deem wealth by no means least useful for this object to a man of sense."
" You speak admirably, Cephalus," said I. "But in respect to this very thing, justice, shall we say that it is truth, thus absolutely, and the restoring of

11. Fragments of Pindar, 24, Bergk's fourth edition.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE may be, he is full of suspicion and dread, and now sets himself to reckon up and consider whether he has ever wronged any one. He, therefore, who finds in his own life many acts of injustice, starts up frequently from his dreams like children, is filled with alarm, and lives with a fearful expectation of what is to come; but if a man is conscious of having done no wrong to others, Hope is always present to soothe him, and to be his gentle nurse in old age, as Pindar says. For this, Socrates, was a beautiful saying of his, that when a man has led a just and holy life, sweet Hope cheering his heart, what is nurse of age, is his companiori,-Hope, who more than aught else governs what is wavering mind of mortal men.(11) There is indeed a wonderful truth in these words of his. Now this it is, in consideration of which I regard what is possession of riches to be of chief value, not to every man indeed, but to what is good man. For as regards what is power of keeping ourselves free from fraud and deceit practised even involuntarily upon others, and in respect to our departing to what is other world without fear because we do not owe travel s to a god or money to men-I say, it is to this end that what is possession of wealth in great measure contributes. And it has many other uses besides ; but comparing one thing with another I, for my part, Socrates, would deem wealth by no means least useful for this object to a man of sense." " You speak admirably, Cephalus," said I. "But in respect to this very thing, justice, shall we say that it is truth, thus absolutely, and what is restoring of 11. Fragments of Pindar, 24, Bergk's fourth edition. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The Republic Of Plato (1901) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 10 where is strong BOOK I where is p align="justify" may be, he is full of suspicion and dread, and now sets himself to reckon up and consider whether he has ever wronged any one. He, therefore, who finds in his own life many acts of injustice, starts up frequently from his dreams like children, is filled with alarm, and lives with a fearful expectation of what is to come; but if a man is conscious of having done no wrong to others, Hope is always present to soothe him, and to be his gentle nurse in old age, as Pindar says. For this, Socrates, was a beautiful saying of his, that when a man has led a just and holy life, sweet Hope cheering his heart, what is nurse of age, is his companiori,-Hope, who more than aught else governs what is wavering mind of mortal men.(11) There is indeed a wonderful truth in these words of his. Now this it is, in consideration of which I regard what is possession of riches to be of chief value, not to every man indeed, but to what is good man. For as regards what is power of keeping ourselves free from fraud and deceit practised even involuntarily upon others, and in respect to our departing to what is other world without fear because we do not owe travel s to a god or money to men-I say, it is to this end that what is possession of wealth in great measure contributes. And it has many other uses besides ; but comparing one thing with another I, for my part, Socrates, would deem wealth by no means least useful for this object to a man of sense." " You speak admirably, Cephalus," said I. "But in respect to this very thing, justice, shall we say that it is truth, thus absolutely, and what is restoring of where is font size="1" 11. Fragments of Pindar, 24, Bergk's fourth edition. where is /font where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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