Books > Old Books > The Republic Of Plato (1901)


Page 2

BOOK I

witness how they would observe the festival, since they were now celebrating it for the first time. The procession of the natives seemed to me to be indeed beautiful ; yet that which the Thracians conducted appeared to be no less brilliant. After we had prayed and witnessed the ceremony, we were in the act or returning to the city, when Polemarchus, the son of Cephalus,(4) catching sight of us at a distance as we had started towards home, ordered his slave to run forward and bid us wait for him. And the

4. Cephalus, a wealthy Syracusan, the father of Polemarchus and the orator Lysias, had, at the invitation of Pericles; removed to Athens. He settled as a resident alien in a commercial centre, and, for a period of thirty years, shared the burdens of Athenian citizenship under the government of the Democracy. During all that time, we are told, he had no occasion to resort to the law courts either as plaintiff or as defendant.
Polemarchus, the eldest of his three sons, who are mentioned in the Republic, met his fate at the hands of the Thirty, in 404 B. C. He was, without trial or accusation, summarily condemned to drink the hemlock. His large fortune acquired in company with his brother Lysias from the manufacture of shields had excited the envy of the tyrants. He is spoken of in the Phaedrus (257 B.) as a student of philosophy.
Lysias, though born in Attica, was not an Athenian citizen. He spent several years of his early life among the colonists at Thurii, in southern Italy, but was compelled to return to Attica in consequence of the defeat of the Athenians at Syracuse. In 404 he narrowly escaped the fate of Polemarchus by fleeing to Megara. After the expulsion of the Thirty and the restoration of the Democracy, he avenged his brother's death by his brilliant oration against Eratosthenes. This harangue, the only one he delivered in person, gained him great reputation, so that he retrieved his ruined fortunes by writing speeches for his clients to be spoken by them before the law courts.
Euthydemus, the son of Cephalus, mentioned only here, must be distinguished from the sophist of Chios who gives his name to one of the dialogues of Plato.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE witness how they would observe what is festival, since they were now celebrating it for what is first time. what is procession of what is natives seemed to me to be indeed beautiful ; yet that which what is Thracians conducted appeared to be no less brilliant. After we had prayed and witnessed what is ceremony, we were in what is act or returning to what is city, when Polemarchus, what is son of Cephalus,(4) catching sight of us at a distance as we had started towards home, ordered his slave to run forward and bid us wait for him. And what is 4. Cephalus, a wealthy Syracusan, what is father of Polemarchus and what is orator Lysias, had, at what is invitation of Pericles; removed to Athens. He settled as a resident alien in a commercial centre, and, for a period of thirty years, shared what is burdens of Athenian citizenship under what is government of what is Democracy. During all that time, we are told, he had no occasion to resort to what is law courts either as plaintiff or as defendant. Polemarchus, what is eldest of his three sons, who are mentioned in what is Republic, met his fate at what is hands of what is Thirty, in 404 B. C. He was, without trial or accusation, summarily condemned to drink what is hemlock. His large fortune acquired in company with his brother Lysias from what is manufacture of shields had excited what is envy of what is tyrants. He is spoken of in what is Phaedrus (257 B.) as a student of philosophy. Lysias, though born in Attica, was not an Athenian citizen. He spent several years of his early life among what is colonists at Thurii, in southern Italy, but was compelled to return to Attica in consequence of what is defeat of what is Athenians at Syracuse. In 404 he narrowly escaped what is fate of Polemarchus by fleeing to Megara. After what is expulsion of what is Thirty and what is restoration of what is Democracy, he avenged his brother's what time is it by his brilliant oration against Eratosthenes. This harangue, what is only one he delivered in person, gained him great reputation, so that he retrieved his ruined fortunes by writing speeches for his clients to be spoken by them before what is law courts. Euthydemus, what is son of Cephalus, mentioned only here, must be distinguished from what is sophist of Chios who gives his name to one of what is dialogues of Plato. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The Republic Of Plato (1901) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 2 where is strong BOOK I where is p align="justify" witness how they would observe what is festival, since they were now celebrating it for what is first time. what is procession of what is natives seemed to me to be indeed beautiful ; yet that which what is Thracians conducted appeared to be no less brilliant. After we had prayed and witnessed what is ceremony, we were in what is act or returning to what is city, when Polemarchus, what is son of Cephalus,(4) catching sight of us at a distance as we had started towards home, ordered his slave to run forward and bid us wait for him. And what is where is font size="1" 4. Cephalus, a wealthy Syracusan, what is father of Polemarchus and what is orator Lysias, had, at what is invitation of Pericles; removed to Athens. He settled as a resident alien in a commercial centre, and, for a period of thirty years, shared what is burdens of Athenian citizenship under what is government of what is Democracy. During all that time, we are told, he had no occasion to resort to what is law courts either as plaintiff or as defendant. Polemarchus, what is eldest of his three sons, who are mentioned in what is Republic, met his fate at what is hands of what is Thirty, in 404 B. C. He was, without trial or accusation, summarily condemned to drink what is hemlock. His large fortune acquired in company with his brother Lysias from what is manufacture of shields had excited the envy of what is tyrants. He is spoken of in what is Phaedrus (257 B.) as a student of philosophy. Lysias, though born in Attica, was not an Athenian citizen. He spent several years of his early life among what is colonists at Thurii, in southern Italy, but was compelled to return to Attica in consequence of what is defeat of what is Athenians at Syracuse. In 404 he narrowly escaped what is fate of Polemarchus by fleeing to Megara. After the expulsion of what is Thirty and what is restoration of what is Democracy, he avenged his brother's what time is it by his brilliant oration against Eratosthenes. This harangue, what is only one he delivered in person, gained him great reputation, so that he retrieved his ruined fortunes by writing speeches for his clients to be spoken by them before what is law courts. Euthydemus, what is son of Cephalus, mentioned only here, must be distinguished from what is sophist of Chios who gives his name to one of what is dialogues of Plato. where is /font where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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