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CHAPTER 20
WINDING UP BY THE COURT

When a winding-up order is made, it is usual to order the costs of (a) the petitioner, (b) the company, and (c) one set of creditors' costs and one set of contributories' costs, to be paid out of the assets .(28)
A copy of the order must be sent by the company to the Registrar of Companies (s. 230).
In addition, three copies must be sent to the Official Receiver. Of these, one must be served on the company at its registered office. Notice of the order is given by the Official Receiver to the Board of Trade, who cause it to be gazetted, and to a local newspaper (r. 41).
The Court has power to stay a winding-up order either for a limited time or on such terms and conditions as it thinks fit after hearing a report by the Official Receiver. A copy of any such order must be sent to the Registrar (s. 256). Such an order is not usually made unless all the creditors are paid or satisfied.
An appeal from the making of a winding-up order may be brought within fourteen days. (29)

CONSEQUENCES OF A WINDING-UP ORDER
The consequences of the making of a winding-up order date back to an earlier date than that on which the order was actually made. This date is called the commencement of the winding up and is (s. 229)
1. The time of the presentation of the petition.
2. Where, before the presentation of the petition, the company was in voluntary liquidation, the passing of the resolution to wind up.
The consequences of a winding-up order are:
1. Any disposition of the property of the company, and any transfer of shares or alteration in the status of the members after the commencement of the winding up is void, unless the Court otherwise orders (s. 227).
The object of this provision is to prevent, during the period which must elapse before a petition can be heard, the improper alienation and dissipation of the property of a company in extremis. The Court can, however, sanction transactions in the ordinary course of business -otherwise the presentation of a petition, whether well or ill-founded, would paralyse the company's trade. (30)

28 Stiebel's Company Law (3rd ed.), p. 816.
29 Ord. 58, rr. 9, 15
30 Per Lord Cairns, Re Wiltshire Iron Co. (1868), L. R. 3 Ch_ 443.

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE When a winding-up order is made, it is usual to order what is costs of (a) what is petitioner, (b) what is company, and (c) one set of creditors' costs and one set of contributories' costs, to be paid out of what is assets .(28) A copy of what is order must be sent by what is company to what is Registrar of Companies (s. 230). In addition, three copies must be sent to what is Official Receiver. Of these, one must be served on what is company at its registered office. Notice of what is order is given by what is Official Receiver to what is Board of Trade, who cause it to be gazetted, and to a local newspaper (r. 41). what is Court has power to stay a winding-up order either for a limited time or on such terms and conditions as it thinks fit after hearing a report by what is Official Receiver. A copy of any such order must be sent to what is Registrar (s. 256). Such an order is not usually made unless all what is creditors are paid or satisfied. An appeal from what is making of a winding-up order may be brought within fourteen days. (29) CONSEQUENCES OF A WINDING-UP ORDER what is consequences of what is making of a winding-up order date back to an earlier date than that on which what is order was actually made. This date is called what is commencement of what is winding up and is (s. 229) 1. what is time of what is presentation of what is petition. 2. Where, before what is presentation of what is petition, what is company was in voluntary liquidation, what is passing of what is resolution to wind up. what is consequences of a winding-up order are: 1. Any disposition of what is property of what is company, and any transfer of shares or alteration in what is status of what is members after what is commencement of what is winding up is void, unless what is Court otherwise orders (s. 227). what is object of this provision is to prevent, during what is period which must elapse before a petition can be heard, what is improper alienation and dissipation of what is property of a company in extremis. what is Court can, however, sanction transactions in what is ordinary course of business -otherwise what is presentation of a petition, whether well or ill-founded, would paralyse what is company's trade. (30) 28 Stiebel's Company Law (3rd ed.), p. 816. 29 Ord. 58, rr. 9, 15 30 Per Lord Cairns, Re Wiltshire Iron Co. (1868), L. R. 3 Ch_ 443. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Poetry Northwest (1959) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 225 where is strong CHAPTER 20 WINDING UP BY what is COURT where is p align="justify" When a winding-up order is made, it is usual to order what is costs of (a) what is petitioner, (b) what is company, and (c) one set of creditors' costs and one set of contributories' costs, to be paid out of what is assets .(28) A copy of what is order must be sent by what is company to what is Registrar of Companies (s. 230). In addition, three copies must be sent to what is Official Receiver. Of these, one must be served on what is company at its registered office. Notice of what is order is given by what is Official Receiver to what is Board of Trade, who cause it to be gazetted, and to a local newspaper (r. 41). what is Court has power to stay a winding-up order either for a limited time or on such terms and conditions as it thinks fit after hearing a report by what is Official Receiver. A copy of any such order must be sent to what is Registrar (s. 256). Such an order is not usually made unless all what is creditors are paid or satisfied. An appeal from what is making of a winding-up order may be brought within fourteen days. (29) CONSEQUENCES OF A WINDING-UP ORDER what is consequences of what is making of a winding-up order date back to an earlier date than that on which what is order was actually made. This date is called what is commencement of what is winding up and is (s. 229) 1. what is time of what is presentation of what is petition. 2. Where, before what is presentation of what is petition, what is company was in voluntary liquidation, what is passing of what is resolution to wind up. what is consequences of a winding-up order are: 1. Any disposition of what is property of what is company, and any transfer of shares or alteration in what is status of what is members after the commencement of what is winding up is void, unless what is Court otherwise orders (s. 227). what is object of this provision is to prevent, during what is period which must elapse before a petition can be heard, what is improper alienation and dissipation of what is property of a company in extremis. what is Court can, however, sanction transactions in what is ordinary course of business -otherwise what is presentation of a petition, whether well or ill-founded, would paralyse what is company's trade. (30) 28 Stiebel's Company Law (3rd ed.), p. 816. 29 Ord. 58, rr. 9, 15 30 Per Lord Cairns, Re Wiltshire Iron Co. (1868), L. R. 3 Ch_ 443. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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