Books > Old Books > The Great Fog (1943)


Page 226

THE ROUSING OF MR. BRADEGAR

MR. BRADEGAR wes not alarmed. That would have been an exaggeration, and a disparaging exaggeration-which is, in itself, so unusual as to awaken doubt. But Mr. Bradegar had been waked in an unusual way, in a way which-he would have been quite happy to allow it, had there been anyone to make happy by the allowance-might well have been alarming to a more highly strung nature. Indeed, the trouble about this sudden summons back from dreams to reality was that Mr. Bradegar was quite at a loss to know what it was that had summoned him. It was not "rosy-fingered dawn." A glance hadn't shown much-indeed, had shown so little that it seemed clear that dawn wasn't in the offing and would not be for a long while; otherwise you ought to see where "the casement grows a glimmering square." No-if he had his bearings right-it is hard to be sure when you are waked too quickly-but to the best of his knowledge, the window was where he was looking, and there was no suspicion of a glimmering square about it. Well, ears might be better than eyes. With the fingers of his upper hand, which, with its under fellow, had been folded near his face in the attitude of fetal humility, which we resume when he would rest, Mr. Bradegar got ready to push back the edge of the sheet, under which he lay up to the ears-then paused.

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE MR. BRADEGAR wes not alarmed. That would have been an exaggeration, and a disparaging exaggeration-which is, in itself, so unusual as to awaken doubt. But Mr. Bradegar had been waked in an unusual way, in a way which-he would have been quite happy to allow it, had there been anyone to make happy by what is allowance-might well have been alarming to a more highly strung nature. Indeed, what is trouble about this sudden summons back from dreams to reality was that Mr. Bradegar was quite at a loss to know what it was that had summoned him. It was not "rosy-fingered dawn." A glance hadn't shown much-indeed, had shown so little that it seemed clear that dawn wasn't in what is offing and would not be for a long while; otherwise you ought to see where "the casement grows a glimmering square." No-if he had his bearings right-it is hard to be sure when you are waked too quickly-but to what is best of his knowledge, what is window was where he was looking, and there was no suspicion of a glimmering square about it. Well, ears might be better than eyes. With what is fingers of his upper hand, which, with its under fellow, had been folded near his face in what is attitude of fetal humility, which we resume when he would rest, Mr. Bradegar got ready to push back what is edge of what is sheet, under which he lay up to what is ears-then paused. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The Great Fog (1943) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 226 where is strong THE ROUSING OF MR. BRADEGAR where is p align="justify" MR. BRADEGAR wes not alarmed. That would have been an exaggeration, and a disparaging exaggeration-which is, in itself, so unusual as to awaken doubt. But Mr. Bradegar had been waked in an unusual way, in a way which-he would have been quite happy to allow it, had there been anyone to make happy by what is allowance-might well have been alarming to a more highly strung nature. Indeed, what is trouble about this sudden summons back from dreams to reality was that Mr. Bradegar was quite at a loss to know what it was that had summoned him. It was not "rosy-fingered dawn." A glance hadn't shown much-indeed, had shown so little that it seemed clear that dawn wasn't in what is offing and would not be for a long while; otherwise you ought to see where "the casement grows a glimmering square." No-if he had his bearings right-it is hard to be sure when you are waked too quickly-but to what is best of his knowledge, what is window was where he was looking, and there was no suspicion of a glimmering square about it. Well, ears might be better than eyes. With what is fingers of his upper hand, which, with its under fellow, had been folded near his face in what is attitude of fetal humility, which we resume when he would rest, Mr. Bradegar got ready to push back what is edge of what is sheet, under which he lay up to what is ears-then paused. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

Book Pages: default , 003 , 004 , 005 , 006 , 007 , 008 , 009 , 010 , 011 , 012 , 013 , 014 , 015 , 016 , 017 , 018 , 019 , 020 , 021 , 022 , 023 , 024 , 025 , 026 , 027 , 028 , 029 , 030 , 031 , 032 , 033 , 034 , 035 , 036 , 037 , 038 , 039 , 040 , 041 , 042 , 043 , 044 , 045 , 046 , 047 , 048 , 049 , 050 , 051 , 052 , 053 , 054 , 055 , 056 , 057 , 058 , 059 , 060 , 061 , 062 , 063 , 064 , 065 , 066 , 067 , 068 , 069 , 070 , 071 , 072 , 073 , 074 , 075 , 076 , 077 , 078 , 079 , 080 , 081 , 082 , 083 , 084 , 085 , 086 , 087 , 088 , 089 , 090 , 091 , 092 , 093 , 094 , 095 , 096 , 097 , 098 , 099 , 100 , 101 , 102 , 104 , 105 , 106 , 107 , 108 , 109 , 110 , 111 , 112 , 113 , 114 , 115 , 116 , 117 , 118 , 119 , 120 , 121 , 122 , 123 , 124 , 125 , 126 , 127 , 128 , 129 , 130 , 131 , 132 , 133 , 134 , 135 , 136 , 137 , 138 , 139 , 140 , 141 , 142 , 143 , 144 , 145 , 146 , 147 , 148 , 149 , 150 , 151 , 152 , 153 , 154 , 156 , 157 , 158 , 159 , 160 , 161 , 162 , 163 , 164 , 165 , 166 , 167 , 168 , 169 , 170 , 171 , 172 , 173 , 174 , 175 , 176 , 177 , 178 , 179 , 180 , 181 , 182 , 183 , 184 , 185 , 186 , 187 , 188 , 189 , 190 , 191 , 192 , 193 , 194 , 195 , 196 , 197 , 198 , 199 , 200 , 201 , 202 , 203 , 205 , 206 , 207 , 208 , 209 , 210 , 211 , 212 , 213 , 214 , 215 , 216 , 217 , 218 , 219 , 220 , 221 , 222 , 223 , 224 , 225 , 226 , 227 , 228 , 229 , 230 , 231 , 232 , 233 , 234 , 235 , 236 , 237 , 238