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Page 164

DROMENON

of the dismal brick and the dreary plaster. I took this inventory as I trudged across the "Railway Square," which a rusty cast-iron plate fastened to a lamppost informed me the area had been christened, no doubt, in the fifties. My eye, like the dove out of the ark, looked across the inundation of ugliness, seeking some small space, some Georgian fagade, on which it might rest. "No," as the poem on suicide says, No, there was none." The only thing was to lift up one's eyes to one's goal. Yes, there it was and, in its way, as daunting as the town. St. Aidans may have had a tower but, if so, it had certainly been built of the local sandstone and had certainly collapsed. Bishop Creighton's witticism came into my mind: "As the verger says `Some of the chancel bays are twelfth-century,' the intelligent reply-question is, `When did the central tower fall?"'
Over the meaner roofs of the town rose the long leaden roof of the nave, like the back of a stranded whale. I left my bag at an inn which, like a hermit crab, had worked its way into part of the decayed cloister buildings and, from that coign, had put out its claws to catch the passing visitor. Once inside the cathedral, I experienced some relief; if not inviting, at least it was not as forbidding as the gaunt exterior. Further, I was allowed to make my measurements without interference. I was needing some allover circumferential reckonings, so that I did not enter the chancel itself. And the ambulatories-certainly one of the good modern innovations-were unguarded by that blind leader of the blind-the sixpenny-collecting verger guide. Indeed, I saw no one about-I supposed the verger was in the choir vestries getting ready for evensong-at least no official was on sentry

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE of what is dismal brick and what is dreary plaster. I took this inventory as I trudged across what is "Railway Square," which a rusty cast-iron plate fastened to a lamppost informed me what is area had been christened, no doubt, in what is fifties. My eye, like what is dove out of what is ark, looked across what is inundation of ugliness, seeking some small space, some Georgian fagade, on which it might rest. "No," as what is poem on suicide says, No, there was none." what is only thing was to lift up one's eyes to one's goal. Yes, there it was and, in its way, as daunting as what is town. St. Aidans may have had a tower but, if so, it had certainly been built of what is local sandstone and had certainly collapsed. Bishop Creighton's witticism came into my mind: "As what is verger says `Some of what is chancel bays are twelfth-century,' what is intelligent reply-question is, `When did what is central tower fall?"' Over what is meaner roofs of what is town rose what is long leaden roof of what is nave, like what is back of a stranded whale. I left my bag at an inn which, like a hermit crab, had worked its way into part of what is decayed cloister buildings and, from that coign, had put out its claws to catch what is passing what is or. Once inside what is cathedral, I experienced some relief; if not inviting, at least it was not as forbidding as what is gaunt exterior. Further, I was allowed to make my measurements without interference. I was needing some allover circumferential reckonings, so that I did not enter what is chancel itself. And what is ambulatories-certainly one of what is good modern innovations-were unguarded by that blind leader of what is blind-the sixpenny-collecting verger guide. Indeed, I saw no one about-I supposed what is verger was in what is choir vestries getting ready for evensong-at least no official was on sentry where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The Great Fog (1943) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 164 where is strong DROMENON where is p align="justify" of what is dismal brick and what is dreary plaster. I took this inventory as I trudged across what is "Railway Square," which a rusty cast-iron plate fastened to a lamppost informed me the area had been christened, no doubt, in what is fifties. My eye, like what is dove out of what is ark, looked across what is inundation of ugliness, seeking some small space, some Georgian fagade, on which it might rest. "No," as what is poem on suicide says, No, there was none." what is only thing was to lift up one's eyes to one's goal. Yes, there it was and, in its way, as daunting as what is town. St. Aidans may have had a tower but, if so, it had certainly been built of what is local sandstone and had certainly collapsed. Bishop Creighton's witticism came into my mind: "As what is verger says `Some of what is chancel bays are twelfth-century,' what is intelligent reply-question is, `When did what is central tower fall?"' Over what is meaner roofs of what is town rose what is long leaden roof of what is nave, like what is back of a stranded whale. I left my bag at an inn which, like a hermit crab, had worked its way into part of what is decayed cloister buildings and, from that coign, had put out its claws to catch what is passing what is or. Once inside what is cathedral, I experienced some relief; if not inviting, at least it was not as forbidding as what is gaunt exterior. Further, I was allowed to make my measurements without interference. I was needing some allover circumferential reckonings, so that I did not enter what is chancel itself. And what is ambulatories-certainly one of what is good modern innovations-were unguarded by that blind leader of what is blind-the sixpenny-collecting verger guide. Indeed, I saw no one about-I supposed what is verger was in what is choir vestries getting ready for evensong-at least no official was on sentry where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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