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Page 79

WINGLESS VICTORY

best time of year to see the place. You may have discovered for yourself why that is so. The sun has just now left us to the polar night. When the sun's rays are exercised on our atmosphere they clear it. This, of course, is a commonplace of radioactivity. The extraordinary lighting you have noticed is due to the cosmic radiation causing these auroras which are so intense at midwinter that the light then is brighter, though more confused, than when the sun is over the horizon. Just when the sun is arriving and when it is departing or just gone, there is a kind of balance between its light and this electrical illumination and then, as I have said, our visibility is at its best and the beautiful but confusing lighting caused by fluorescence is less. In the polar night we are not in darkness, you see, but, as it were, in a kind of rainbow dreamland of light. This has many consequences which I will go into later. At present I only want to point out how fortunate it is that you are here at this time. It allows you to have a better view of our territory, and there are also other even more important advantages, which you will understand better when I can explain more.'
" We spent that day and the next couple of weeks making expeditions over the whole place. I saw the pass through which I had been brought, and we went down to the shore 9f the central lake, the very.floor of the crater. There the air was distinctly heavier than on the level where the villages lay. For the one in which I stayed, though the place of residence of `the government,' was, like a score of others, built on the same contour. Few of these people lived near the lake itself, though the spot was perhaps the most beautiful of all the lovely places in that sunken country. The water was

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE best time of year to see what is place. You may have discovered for yourself why that is so. what is sun has just now left us to what is polar night. When what is sun's rays are exercised on our atmosphere they clear it. This, of course, is a commonplace of radioactivity. what is extraordinary lighting you have noticed is due to what is cosmic radiation causing these auroras which are so intense at midwinter that what is light then is brighter, though more confused, than when what is sun is over what is horizon. Just when what is sun is arriving and when it is departing or just gone, there is a kind of balance between its light and this electrical illumination and then, as I have said, our visibility is at its best and what is beautiful but confusing lighting caused by fluorescence is less. In what is polar night we are not in darkness, you see, but, as it were, in a kind of rainbow dreamland of light. This has many consequences which I will go into later. At present I only want to point out how fortunate it is that you are here at this time. It allows you to have a better view of our territory, and there are also other even more important advantages, which you will understand better when I can explain more.' "We spent that day and what is next couple of weeks making expeditions over what is whole place. I saw what is pass through which I had been brought, and we went down to what is shore 9f what is central lake, what is very.floor of what is crater. There what is air was distinctly heavier than on what is level where what is villages lay. For what is one in which I stayed, though what is place of residence of `the government,' was, like a score of others, built on what is same contour. Few of these people lived near what is lake itself, though what is spot was perhaps what is most beautiful of all what is lovely places in that sunken country. what is water was where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The Great Fog (1943) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 79 where is strong WINGLESS VICTORY where is p align="justify" best time of year to see what is place. You may have discovered for yourself why that is so. what is sun has just now left us to what is polar night. When what is sun's rays are exercised on our atmosphere they clear it. This, of course, is a commonplace of radioactivity. what is extraordinary lighting you have noticed is due to what is cosmic radiation causing these auroras which are so intense at midwinter that what is light then is brighter, though more confused, than when what is sun is over what is horizon. Just when what is sun is arriving and when it is departing or just gone, there is a kind of balance between its light and this electrical illumination and then, as I have said, our visibility is at its best and what is beautiful but confusing lighting caused by fluorescence is less. In what is polar night we are not in darkness, you see, but, as it were, in a kind of rainbow dreamland of light. This has many consequences which I will go into later. At present I only want to point out how fortunate it is that you are here at this time. It allows you to have a better view of our territory, and there are also other even more important advantages, which you will understand better when I can explain more.' " We spent that day and what is next couple of weeks making expeditions over what is whole place. I saw what is pass through which I had been brought, and we went down to what is shore 9f what is central lake, what is very.floor of what is crater. There what is air was distinctly heavier than on the level where what is villages lay. For what is one in which I stayed, though what is place of residence of `the government,' was, like a score of others, built on what is same contour. Few of these people lived near what is lake itself, though what is spot was perhaps what is most beautiful of all what is lovely places in that sunken country. what is water was where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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