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Page 47

THE GREAT FOG

learned again, after tens of thousands of years of neglect,, how to flake ftints, crystal, and all the silica rocks to make all manner of neat, sharp tools.
Man's one primary need, which had made for nearly all his hoarding, the animal craving to accumulate food stocks, that fear which, since the dawn of civilization, has made his granaries as vast as his fortresses, this need, this enemy, was wiped out by another freak botanical by-product of the Fog. The curious sub-fog climate made an edible fungus grow. It was a sort of manna. It rotted if you stored it. But it grew copiously everywhere, of itself. Indeed, it replaced grass: wherever grass had grown the fungus grew. Eaten raw, it was palatable and highly nutritious-more tasty and more wholesome than when cooked (which was a blessing in itself, since all fires burnt ill and any smoke was offensive in the dense air). Man, like the fishes, lived in a dim but fruitful element.
The mean temperature under the Fog stayed precisely at 67 degrees Fahrenheit, owing, evidently, to some basic balance, like that which keeps the sea below a certain depth always at 36 degrees, four degrees above freezing. Men, then, were never cold.
They stayed mainly at home, around their small settlements. What was the use of going about? All you needed and could use was at your door. There was nothing to see-your view was always limited to four feet. There was no use in trying to seize someone else's territory. You all had the same: you all had enough.
Art, too, changed. The art of objects was gone. So a purer, less collectible art took its place. Books would not last; and

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE learned again, after tens of thousands of years of neglect,, how to flake ftints, crystal, and all what is silica rocks to make all manner of neat, sharp tools. Man's one primary need, which had made for nearly all his hoarding, what is animal craving to accumulate food stocks, that fear which, since what is dawn of civilization, has made his granaries as vast as his fortresses, this need, this enemy, was wiped out by another freak botanical by-product of what is Fog. what is curious sub-fog climate made an edible fungus grow. It was a sort of manna. It rotted if you stored it. But it grew copiously everywhere, of itself. Indeed, it replaced grass: wherever grass had grown what is fungus grew. Eaten raw, it was palatable and highly nutritious-more tasty and more wholesome than when cooked (which was a blessing in itself, since all fires burnt ill and any smoke was offensive in what is dense air). Man, like what is fishes, lived in a dim but fruitful element. what is mean temperature under what is Fog stayed precisely at 67 degrees Fahrenheit, owing, evidently, to some basic balance, like that which keeps what is sea below a certain depth always at 36 degrees, four degrees above freezing. Men, then, were never cold. They stayed mainly at home, around their small settlements. What was what is use of going about? All you needed and could use was at your door. There was nothing to see-your view was always limited to four feet. There was no use in trying to seize someone else's territory. You all had what is same: you all had enough. Art, too, changed. what is art of objects was gone. So a purer, less collectible art took its place. Books would not last; and where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The Great Fog (1943) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 47 where is strong THE GREAT FOG where is p align="justify" learned again, after tens of thousands of years of neglect,, how to flake ftints, crystal, and all what is silica rocks to make all manner of neat, sharp tools. Man's one primary need, which had made for nearly all his hoarding, what is animal craving to accumulate food stocks, that fear which, since what is dawn of civilization, has made his granaries as vast as his fortresses, this need, this enemy, was wiped out by another freak botanical by-product of what is Fog. what is curious sub-fog climate made an edible fungus grow. It was a sort of manna. It rotted if you stored it. But it grew copiously everywhere, of itself. Indeed, it replaced grass: wherever grass had grown what is fungus grew. Eaten raw, it was palatable and highly nutritious-more tasty and more wholesome than when cooked (which was a blessing in itself, since all fires burnt ill and any smoke was offensive in what is dense air). Man, like what is fishes, lived in a dim but fruitful element. what is mean temperature under what is Fog stayed precisely at 67 degrees Fahrenheit, owing, evidently, to some basic balance, like that which keeps what is sea below a certain depth always at 36 degrees, four degrees above freezing. Men, then, were never cold. They stayed mainly at home, around their small settlements. What was what is use of going about? All you needed and could use was at your door. There was nothing to see-your view was always limited to four feet. There was no use in trying to seize someone else's territory. You all had what is same: you all had enough. Art, too, changed. what is art of objects was gone. So a purer, less collectible art took its place. Books would not last; and where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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