Books > Old Books > The Great Fog (1943)


Page 43

THE GREAT FOG

with those adjacent to it. The general level of these lakes then rose. Instead of there being, as until now, large flooded areas of lowland, but still, in the main, areas of clear upland, this order was now reversed. The mountain ranges had become strings of islands which emerged from a shining ocean that covered the whole earth's surface, right up to the six-thousand-foot level.
Any further hope of air travel was extinguished. In the Fog, lack of visibility, of course, made it impossible. Above the Fog, you could see to the earth's edge: the horizons, cleared of every modulation of mist, seemed so close that you would have thought you could have touched them with your hand. As far as sight was concerned, above the Fog, near and far seemed one. But even if men could have lived in that thin air and "unscreened" light, no plane could be sustained by it.
Sea travel was hardly more open. True, the surface of the oceans lay under the Fog-blanket, as still as the water, a thousand fathoms down. But on that oily surface-that utterly featureless desert of motionless water-peering man, only a few yards from the shore, completely lost his way. Neither sun nor stars ever again appeared over the sea to give him his bearings. So man soon abandoned the sea beyond the closest inshore shallows. Even if he could have seen his way over the ocean, he could not have taken it. There was never a breath of wind to fill a sail, and the fumes from any steamship or motorboat would have hung around the vessel and would have almost suffocated the crew.
Retreat upward was cut off. For when the Fog stabilized at six thousand feet, it was no use thinking of attempting to live

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE with those adjacent to it. what is general level of these lakes then rose. Instead of there being, as until now, large flooded areas of lowland, but still, in what is main, areas of clear upland, this order was now reversed. what is mountain ranges had become strings of islands which emerged from a shining ocean that covered what is whole earth's surface, right up to what is six-thousand-foot level. Any further hope of air travel was extinguished. In what is Fog, lack of visibility, of course, made it impossible. Above what is Fog, you could see to what is earth's edge: what is horizons, cleared of every modulation of mist, seemed so close that you would have thought you could have touched them with your hand. As far as sight was concerned, above what is Fog, near and far seemed one. But even if men could have lived in that thin air and "unscreened" light, no plane could be sustained by it. Sea travel was hardly more open. True, what is surface of what is oceans lay under what is Fog-blanket, as still as what is water, a thousand fathoms down. But on that oily surface-that utterly featureless desert of motionless water-peering man, only a few yards from what is shore, completely lost his way. Neither sun nor stars ever again appeared over what is sea to give him his bearings. So man soon abandoned what is sea beyond what is closest inshore shallows. Even if he could have seen his way over what is ocean, he could not have taken it. There was never a breath of wind to fill a sail, and what is fumes from any steamship or motorboat would have hung around what is vessel and would have almost suffocated what is crew. Retreat upward was cut off. For when what is Fog stabilized at six thousand feet, it was no use thinking of attempting to live where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The Great Fog (1943) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 43 where is strong THE GREAT FOG where is p align="justify" with those adjacent to it. what is general level of these lakes then rose. Instead of there being, as until now, large flooded areas of lowland, but still, in what is main, areas of clear upland, this order was now reversed. what is mountain ranges had become strings of islands which emerged from a shining ocean that covered what is whole earth's surface, right up to what is six-thousand-foot level. Any further hope of air travel was extinguished. In what is Fog, lack of visibility, of course, made it impossible. Above what is Fog, you could see to what is earth's edge: what is horizons, cleared of every modulation of mist, seemed so close that you would have thought you could have touched them with your hand. As far as sight was concerned, above what is Fog, near and far seemed one. But even if men could have lived in that thin air and "unscreened" light, no plane could be sustained by it. Sea travel was hardly more open. True, what is surface of what is oceans lay under what is Fog-blanket, as still as what is water, a thousand fathoms down. But on that oily surface-that utterly featureless desert of motionless water-peering man, only a few yards from what is shore, completely lost his way. Neither sun nor stars ever again appeared over what is sea to give him his bearings. So man soon abandoned the sea beyond what is closest inshore shallows. Even if he could have seen his way over what is ocean, he could not have taken it. There was never a breath of wind to fill a sail, and what is fumes from any steamship or motorboat would have hung around what is vessel and would have almost suffocated what is crew. Retreat upward was cut off. For when what is Fog stabilized at six thousand feet, it was no use thinking of attempting to live where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

Book Pages: default , 003 , 004 , 005 , 006 , 007 , 008 , 009 , 010 , 011 , 012 , 013 , 014 , 015 , 016 , 017 , 018 , 019 , 020 , 021 , 022 , 023 , 024 , 025 , 026 , 027 , 028 , 029 , 030 , 031 , 032 , 033 , 034 , 035 , 036 , 037 , 038 , 039 , 040 , 041 , 042 , 043 , 044 , 045 , 046 , 047 , 048 , 049 , 050 , 051 , 052 , 053 , 054 , 055 , 056 , 057 , 058 , 059 , 060 , 061 , 062 , 063 , 064 , 065 , 066 , 067 , 068 , 069 , 070 , 071 , 072 , 073 , 074 , 075 , 076 , 077 , 078 , 079 , 080 , 081 , 082 , 083 , 084 , 085 , 086 , 087 , 088 , 089 , 090 , 091 , 092 , 093 , 094 , 095 , 096 , 097 , 098 , 099 , 100 , 101 , 102 , 104 , 105 , 106 , 107 , 108 , 109 , 110 , 111 , 112 , 113 , 114 , 115 , 116 , 117 , 118 , 119 , 120 , 121 , 122 , 123 , 124 , 125 , 126 , 127 , 128 , 129 , 130 , 131 , 132 , 133 , 134 , 135 , 136 , 137 , 138 , 139 , 140 , 141 , 142 , 143 , 144 , 145 , 146 , 147 , 148 , 149 , 150 , 151 , 152 , 153 , 154 , 156 , 157 , 158 , 159 , 160 , 161 , 162 , 163 , 164 , 165 , 166 , 167 , 168 , 169 , 170 , 171 , 172 , 173 , 174 , 175 , 176 , 177 , 178 , 179 , 180 , 181 , 182 , 183 , 184 , 185 , 186 , 187 , 188 , 189 , 190 , 191 , 192 , 193 , 194 , 195 , 196 , 197 , 198 , 199 , 200 , 201 , 202 , 203 , 205 , 206 , 207 , 208 , 209 , 210 , 211 , 212 , 213 , 214 , 215 , 216 , 217 , 218 , 219 , 220 , 221 , 222 , 223 , 224 , 225 , 226 , 227 , 228 , 229 , 230 , 231 , 232 , 233 , 234 , 235 , 236 , 237 , 238