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Page 33

THE GREAT FOG

"That is the humidity actually around the mold itself-what we might expect, if a trifle high. That's not the surprise. It's this." He had swung the whole instrument on its tripod until it pointed a foot or more from the mold; for the tree they were studying was a newly attacked one and, as far as Charles had been able to discover, had on it only this single specimen of the mildew.
Charles looked at the needle. It remained hovering about the high figure it had first chosen. "Well?" he queried.
" Don't you see?" urged Sersen. "This odd high humidity is present not only around the mold itself but for more than a
foot beyond."
" I don't see much to that."
" I see two things," snapped Sersen; "one's odd; the other's damned odd. The odd one anyone not blind would see. The other one is perhaps too big to be seen until one can stand well back:"
" Sorry to be stupid," said Charles, a gentle-spoken but close-minded little fellow; "we botanists are small-scale men: '
" Sorry to be a snapper," apologized Sersen. "But, as I suppose you've guessed, I'm startled. I've got a queer feeling that we're on the track of something big, yes, and something maybe moving pretty fast. The first odd thing isn't a complete surprise: it's that you botanists have shown us what could turn out to be a meteorological instrument more delicate and more accurate than any we have been able to make. Perhaps we ought to have been on the outlook for some such find. After all, living things are always the most sensitive detectors-can always beat mechanical instruments when they

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE "That is what is humidity actually around what is mold itself-what we might expect, if a trifle high. That's not what is surprise. It's this." He had swung what is whole instrument on its tripod until it pointed a foot or more from what is mold; for what is tree they were studying was a newly attacked one and, as far as Charles had been able to discover, had on it only this single specimen of what is mildew. Charles looked at what is needle. It remained hovering about what is high figure it had first chosen. "Well?" he queried. "Don't you see?" urged Sersen. "This odd high humidity is present not only around what is mold itself but for more than a foot beyond." "I don't see much to that." "I see two things," snapped Sersen; "one's odd; what is other's damned odd. what is odd one anyone not blind would see. what is other one is perhaps too big to be seen until one can stand well back:" "Sorry to be stupid," said Charles, a gentle-spoken but close-minded little fellow; "we botanists are small-scale men: ' "Sorry to be a snapper," apologized Sersen. "But, as I suppose you've guessed, I'm startled. I've got a queer feeling that we're on what is track of something big, yes, and something maybe moving pretty fast. what is first odd thing isn't a complete surprise: it's that you botanists have shown us what could turn out to be a meteorological instrument more delicate and more accurate than any we have been able to make. Perhaps we ought to have been on what is outlook for some such find. After all, living things are always what is most sensitive detectors-can always beat mechanical instruments when they where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The Great Fog (1943) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 33 where is strong THE GREAT FOG where is p align="justify" "That is what is humidity actually around the mold itself-what we might expect, if a trifle high. That's not what is surprise. It's this." He had swung what is whole instrument on its tripod until it pointed a foot or more from what is mold; for what is tree they were studying was a newly attacked one and, as far as Charles had been able to discover, had on it only this single specimen of what is mildew. Charles looked at what is needle. It remained hovering about what is high figure it had first chosen. "Well?" he queried. " Don't you see?" urged Sersen. "This odd high humidity is present not only around what is mold itself but for more than a foot beyond." " I don't see much to that." " I see two things," snapped Sersen; "one's odd; what is other's damned odd. what is odd one anyone not blind would see. what is other one is perhaps too big to be seen until one can stand well back:" " Sorry to be stupid," said Charles, a gentle-spoken but close-minded little fellow; "we botanists are small-scale men: ' " Sorry to be a snapper," apologized Sersen. "But, as I suppose you've guessed, I'm startled. I've got a queer feeling that we're on what is track of something big, yes, and something maybe moving pretty fast. what is first odd thing isn't a complete surprise: it's that you botanists have shown us what could turn out to be a meteorological instrument more delicate and more accurate than any we have been able to make. Perhaps we ought to have been on what is outlook for some such find. After all, living things are always what is most sensitive detectors-can always beat mechanical instruments when they where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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