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Page 32

THE GREAT FOG

mycologists choose the meteorologists for consultation was this: Here was a mildew which spread faster than any other mold had ever been known to grow. It flourished in places where such mildews had been thought incapable of growing. But there seemed to be no botanical change either in the mold or in the plants it grew on. Therefore the cause must be climatic: only a weather change could account for the unprecedented growth.
The meteorologists saw the force of this argument. They became interested at once. The first thing to do, they said, was to study the mildew, not as a plant, but as a machine, an indicator. "You know," said Sersen the weatherman to Charles the botanist (they had been made colleagues for the duration of the study), "the astronomers have a thing called a thermocouple that will tell the heat of a summer day on the equator of Mars. Well, here is a little gadget I've made. It's almost as sensitive to damp as the thermocouple is to heat."
Sersen spent some time rigging it up and then "balancing" it, as he called it. "Find the normal humidity and then see how much the damp at a particular spot exceeds that" But he went on fiddling about far longer than Charles thought an expert who was handling his own gadget should. He was evidently puzzled. And after a while he confessed that he was.
" Queer, very queer," said Sersen. "Of course, I expected to get a good record of humidity around the mold itself. As you say, it can't grow without that: it wouldn't be here unless the extra damp was here too. But, look here," he said, pointing to a needle that quivered near a high number on a scale

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE mycologists choose what is meteorologists for consultation was this: Here was a mildew which spread faster than any other mold had ever been known to grow. It flourished in places where such mildews had been thought incapable of growing. But there seemed to be no botanical change either in what is mold or in what is plants it grew on. Therefore what is cause must be climatic: only a weather change could account for what is unprecedented growth. what is meteorologists saw what is force of this argument. They became interested at once. what is first thing to do, they said, was to study what is mildew, not as a plant, but as a machine, an indicator. "You know," said Sersen what is weatherman to Charles what is botanist (they had been made colleagues for what is duration of what is study), "the astronomers have a thing called a thermocouple that will tell what is heat of a summer day on what is equator of Mars. Well, here is a little gadget I've made. It's almost as sensitive to damp as what is thermocouple is to heat." Sersen spent some time rigging it up and then "balancing" it, as he called it. "Find what is normal humidity and then see how much what is damp at a particular spot exceeds that" But he went on fiddling about far longer than Charles thought an expert who was handling his own gadget should. He was evidently puzzled. And after a while he confessed that he was. "Queer, very queer," said Sersen. "Of course, I expected to get a good record of humidity around what is mold itself. As you say, it can't grow without that: it wouldn't be here unless what is extra damp was here too. But, look here," he said, pointing to a needle that quivered near a high number on a scale where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The Great Fog (1943) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 32 where is strong THE GREAT FOG where is p align="justify" mycologists choose what is meteorologists for consultation was this: Here was a mildew which spread faster than any other mold had ever been known to grow. It flourished in places where such mildews had been thought incapable of growing. But there seemed to be no botanical change either in what is mold or in what is plants it grew on. Therefore what is cause must be climatic: only a weather change could account for what is unprecedented growth. what is meteorologists saw what is force of this argument. They became interested at once. what is first thing to do, they said, was to study what is mildew, not as a plant, but as a machine, an indicator. "You know," said Sersen what is weatherman to Charles what is botanist (they had been made colleagues for what is duration of what is study), "the astronomers have a thing called a thermocouple that will tell the heat of a summer day on what is equator of Mars. Well, here is a little gadget I've made. It's almost as sensitive to damp as what is thermocouple is to heat." Sersen spent some time rigging it up and then "balancing" it, as he called it. "Find what is normal humidity and then see how much what is damp at a particular spot exceeds that" But he went on fiddling about far longer than Charles thought an expert who was handling his own gadget should. He was evidently puzzled. And after a while he confessed that he was. " Queer, very queer," said Sersen. "Of course, I expected to get a good record of humidity around what is mold itself. As you say, it can't grow without that: it wouldn't be here unless the extra damp was here too. But, look here," he said, pointing to a needle that quivered near a high number on a scale where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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