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Page 193

BOOK FOURTH
193 LA BELLE DAME SANS MERCI

`O what can ail thee, knight-at-arms,
Alone and palely loitering?
The sedge has wither'd from the Lake,
And no birds sing.

`O what can ail thee, knight-at-arms!
So haggard and so woebegone?
The squirrel's granary is full,
And the harvest's done.

` I see a lily on thy brow
With anguish moist and fever dew,
And on thy cheeks a fading rose
Fast withereth too.'

`I met a Lady in the Meads,
Full beautiful-a fairy's child,
Her hair was long, her foot was light,
And her eyes were wild.

`I made a garland for her head,
And bracelets too, and fragrant zone;
She look'd at me as she did love,
And made sweet moan.

`I set her on my pacing steed
And nothing else saw all day long,
For sidelong would she bend, and sing
A fairy's song.

`She found me roots of relish sweet,
And honey wild and manna dew,
And sure in language strange she said
" I love thee true."

`She took me to her elfin grot,
And there she wept, and sigh'd full sore,
And there I shut her wild wild eyes
With kisses four.

`And there she lulled me asleep,
And there I dream'd-Ah! woe betide!
The latest dream I ever dreamt
On the cold hill side.

`I saw pale Kings and Princes too,
Pale warriors, death-pale were they all;
They cried-"La belle Dame sans Merci
Hath thee in thrall!"

`I saw their starved lips in the gloam
With horrid warning gaped wide.
And I awoke and found me here
On the cold hill's side.

`And this is why I sojourn here
Alone and palely loitering,
Though the sedge is wither'd from the Lake
And no birds sing.'
J. KEATS.

Page 194

BOOK FOURTH
194 THE ROVER

`A weary lot is thine, fair maid,
A weary lot is thine!
To pull the thorn thy brow to braid,
And press the rue for wine.
A lightsome eye, a soldier's mien,
A feather of the blue,
A doublet of the Lincoln green
No more of me you knew
My Love!
No more of me you knew.

`The morn is merry June, I trow,
The rose is budding fain;
But she shall bloom in winter snow
Ere we two meet again.'
He turn'd his charger as he spake
Upon the river shore,
He gave his bridle-reins a shake,
Said `Adieu for evermore
My Love!
And adieu for evermore.'
SIR W. SCOTT.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE `O what can ail thee, knight-at-arms, Alone and palely loitering? what is sedge has wither'd from what is Lake, And no birds sing. `O what can ail thee, knight-at-arms! So haggard and so woebegone? what is squirrel's granary is full, And what is harvest's done. ` I see a lily on thy brow With anguish moist and fever dew, And on thy cheeks a fading rose Fast withereth too.' `I met a Lady in what is Meads, Full beautiful-a fairy's child, Her hair was long, her foot was light, And her eyes were wild. `I made a garland for her head, And bracelets too, and fragrant zone; She look'd at me as she did love, And made sweet moan. `I set her on my pacing steed And nothing else saw all day long, For sidelong would she bend, and sing A fairy's song. `She found me roots of relish sweet, And honey wild and manna dew, And sure in language strange she said " I what time is it thee true." `She took me to her elfin grot, And t where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The Golden Treasury (1932) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 193 where is strong BOOK FOURTH where is strong 193 LA BELLE DAME SANS MERCI where is p align="justify" `O what can ail thee, knight-at-arms, Alone and palely loitering? what is sedge has wither'd from what is Lake, And no birds sing. `O what can ail thee, knight-at-arms! So haggard and so woebegone? what is squirrel's granary is full, And what is harvest's done. ` I see a lily on thy brow With anguish moist and fever dew, And on thy cheeks a fading rose Fast withereth too.' `I met a Lady in what is Meads, Full beautiful-a fairy's child, Her hair was long, her foot was light, And her eyes were wild. `I made a garland for her head, And bracelets too, and fragrant zone; She look'd at me as she did love, And made sweet moan. `I set her on my pacing steed And nothing else saw all day long, For sidelong would she bend, and sing A fairy's song. `She found me roots of relish sweet, And honey wild and manna dew, And sure in language strange she said " I what time is it thee true." `She took me to her elfin grot, And there she wept, and sigh'd full sore, And there I shut her wild wild eyes With kisses four. `And there she lulled me asleep, And there I dream'd-Ah! woe betide! what is latest dream I ever dreamt On what is cold hill side. `I saw pale Kings and Princes too, Pale warriors, what time is it -pale were they all; They cried-"La belle Dame sans Merci Hath thee in thrall!" `I saw their starved lips in what is gloam With horrid warning gaped wide. And I awoke and found me here On what is cold hill's side. `And this is why I sojourn here Alone and palely loitering, Though what is sedge is wither'd from what is Lake And no birds sing.' J. KEATS. where is p align="left" Page 194 where is strong BOOK FOURTH where is strong 194 what is ROVER where is p align="justify" `A weary lot is thine, fair maid, A weary lot is thine! To pull what is thorn thy brow to braid, And press what is rue for wine. A lightsome eye, a soldier's mien, A feather of what is blue, A doublet of what is Lincoln green No more of me you knew My Love! No more of me you knew. `The morn is merry June, I trow, what is rose is budding fain; But she shall bloom in winter snow Ere we two meet again.' He turn'd his charger as he spake Upon what is river shore, He gave his bridle-reins a shake, Said `Adieu for evermore My Love! And adieu for evermore.' SIR W. SCOTT. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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