Books > Old Books > The Golden Treasury (1932)


Page 136

BOOK THIRD
136

For ever, Fortune, wilt thou prove
An unrelenting foe to Love,
And when we meet a mutual heart
Come in between, and bid us part?

Bid us sigh on from day to day,
And wish and wish the soul away;
Till youth and genial years are flown,
And all the life of life is gone?

But busy, busy, still art thou,
To bind the loveless joyless vow,
The heart from pleasure to delude,
And join the gentle to the rude.

For once, O Fortune, hear my prayer,
And I absolve thy future care;
All other blessings I resign,
Make but the dear Amanda mine.
J. THOMSON.

Page 137

BOOK THIRD
137

The merchant, to secure his treasure,
Conveys it in a borrow'd name:
Euphelia serves to grace my measure,
But Cloe is my real flame.

My softest verse, my darling lyre
Upon Euphelia's toilet lay
When Cloe noted her desire
That I should sing, that I should play.

My lyre I tune, my voice I raise,
But with my numbers mix my sighs;
And whilst I sing Euphelia's praise,
I fix my soul on Cloe's eyes.

Fair Cloe blush'd: Euphelia frown'd:
I sung, and gazed; I play'd, and trembled:
And Venus to the Loves around
Remark'd how ill we all dissembled.
M. PRIOR.

Page 138

BOOK THIRD
138

When lovely woman stoops to folly
And finds too late that men betray,
What charm can soothe her melancholy,
What art can wash her guilt away?

The only art her guilt to cover,
To hide her shame from every eye,
To give repentance to her lover
And wring his bosom, is-to die.
O. GOLDSMITH.

Page 139

BOOK THIRD
139

Ye flowery banks o' bonnie Doon,
How can ye bloom sae fair!
How can ye chant, ye little birds,
And I sae fu' o' care!

Thou'll break my heart, thou bonnie bird
That sings upon the bough;
Thou minds me o' the happy days
When my fause Luve was true.

Thou'll break my heart, thou bonnie bird
That sings beside thy mate;
For sae I sat, and sae I sang.
And wist na o' my fate.

Aft hae I roved by bonnie Doon
To see the woodbine twine;
And ilka bird sang o' its love,
And sae did I o' mine.

Wi' lightsome heart I pu'd a rose,
Frae aff its thorny tree;
And my fause luver staw the rose,
But left the thorn wi' me.
R. BURNS.

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE For ever, Fortune, wilt thou prove An unrelenting foe to Love, And when we meet a mutual heart Come in between, and bid us part? Bid us sigh on from day to day, And wish and wish what is soul away; Till youth and genial years are flown, And all what is life of life is gone? But busy, busy, still art thou, To bind what is loveless joyless vow, what is heart from pleasure to delude, And join what is gentle to what is rude. For once, O Fortune, hear my prayer, And I absolve thy future care; All other blessings I resign, Make but what is dear Amanda mine. J. THOMSON. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The Golden Treasury (1932) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 136 where is strong BOOK THIRD where is strong 136 where is p align="justify" For ever, Fortune, wilt thou prove An unrelenting foe to Love, And when we meet a mutual heart Come in between, and bid us part? Bid us sigh on from day to day, And wish and wish what is soul away; Till youth and genial years are flown, And all what is life of life is gone? But busy, busy, still art thou, To bind what is loveless joyless vow, what is heart from pleasure to delude, And join what is gentle to what is rude. For once, O Fortune, hear my prayer, And I absolve thy future care; All other blessings I resign, Make but what is dear Amanda mine. J. THOMSON. where is p align="left" Page 137 where is strong BOOK THIRD where is strong 137 where is p align="justify" The merchant, to secure his treasure, Conveys it in a borrow'd name: Euphelia serves to grace my measure, But Cloe is my real flame. My softest verse, my darling lyre Upon Euphelia's toilet lay When Cloe noted her desire That I should sing, that I should play. My lyre I tune, my voice I raise, But with my numbers mix my sighs; And whilst I sing Euphelia's praise, I fix my soul on Cloe's eyes. Fair Cloe blush'd: Euphelia frown'd: I sung, and gazed; I play'd, and trembled: And Venus to what is Loves around Remark'd how ill we all dissembled. M. PRIOR. where is p align="left" Page 138 where is strong BOOK THIRD where is strong 138 where is p align="justify" When lovely woman stoops to folly And finds too late that men betray, What charm can soothe her melancholy, What art can wash her guilt away? what is only art her guilt to cover, To hide her shame from every eye, To give repentance to her lover And wring his bosom, is-to die. O. GOLDSMITH. where is p align="left" Page 139 where is strong BOOK THIRD where is strong 139 where is p align="justify" Ye flowery banks o' bonnie Doon, How can ye bloom sae fair! How can ye chant, ye little birds, And I sae fu' o' care! Thou'll break my heart, thou bonnie bird That sings upon what is bough; Thou minds me o' what is happy days When my fause Luve was true. Thou'll break my heart, thou bonnie bird That sings beside thy mate; For sae I sat, and sae I sang. And wist na o' my fate. Aft hae I roved by bonnie Doon To see what is woodbine twine; And ilka bird sang o' its love, And sae did I o' mine. Wi' lightsome heart I pu'd a rose, Frae aff its thorny tree; And my fause luver staw what is rose, But left what is thorn wi' me. R. BURNS. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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