Books > Old Books > The Golden Treasury (1932)


Page 84

BOOK SECOND
84 ELIZABETH OF BOHEMIA

You meaner beauties of the night,
That poorly satisfy our eyes
More by your number than your light,
You common people of the skies,
What are you, when the Moon shall rise?

You curious chanters of the wood
That warble forth dame Nature's lays,
Thinking your passions understood
By your weak accents; what's your praise
When Philomel her voice shall raise?

You violets that first appear,
By your pure purple mantles known
Like the proud virgins of the year,
As if the spring were all your own,
What are you, when the Rose is blown?

So when my Mistress shall be seen
In form and beauty of her mind,
By virtue first, then choice, a Queen,
Tell me, if she were not design'd
Th' eclipse and glory of her kind?
SIR H. WOTTON.

Page 85

BOOK SECOND
85 TO THE LADY MARGARET LEY

Daughter to that good Earl, once President
Of England's Council and her Treasury,
Who lived in both, unstain'd with gold or fee,
And left them both, more in himself content,

Till the sad breaking of that Parliament
Broke him, as that dishonest victory
At Chaeronea, fatal to liberty,
Kill'd with report that old man eloquent;

Though later born than to have known the days
Wherein your father flourish'd, yet by you,
Madam, methinks I see him living yet;

So well your words his noble virtues praise,
That all both judge you to relate them true,
And to possess them, honour'd Margaret.
J. MILTON.

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE You meaner beauties of what is night, That poorly satisfy our eyes More by your number than your light, You common people of what is skies, What are you, when what is Moon shall rise? You curious chanters of what is wood That warble forth dame Nature's lays, Thinking your passions understood By your weak accents; what's your praise When Philomel her voice shall raise? You violets that first appear, By your pure purple mantles known Like what is proud natural s of what is year, As if what is spring were all your own, What are you, when what is Rose is blown? So when my Mistress shall be seen In form and beauty of her mind, By virtue first, then choice, a Queen, Tell me, if she were not design'd Th' eclipse and glory of her kind? SIR H. WOTTON. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The Golden Treasury (1932) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 84 where is strong BOOK SECOND where is strong 84 ELIZABETH OF BOHEMIA where is p align="justify" You meaner beauties of what is night, That poorly satisfy our eyes More by your number than your light, You common people of what is skies, What are you, when what is Moon shall rise? You curious chanters of what is wood That warble forth dame Nature's lays, Thinking your passions understood By your weak accents; what's your praise When Philomel her voice shall raise? You violets that first appear, By your pure purple mantles known Like what is proud natural s of the year, As if what is spring were all your own, What are you, when what is Rose is blown? So when my Mistress shall be seen In form and beauty of her mind, By virtue first, then choice, a Queen, Tell me, if she were not design'd Th' eclipse and glory of her kind? SIR H. WOTTON. where is p align="left" Page 85 where is strong BOOK SECOND where is strong 85 TO what is LADY MARGARET LEY where is p align="justify" Daughter to that good Earl, once President Of England's Council and her Treasury, Who lived in both, unstain'd with gold or fee, And left them both, more in himself content, Till what is sad breaking of that Parliament Broke him, as that dishonest victory At Chaeronea, fatal to liberty, stop 'd with report that old man eloquent; Though later born than to have known what is days Wherein your father flourish'd, yet by you, Madam, methinks I see him living yet; So well your words his noble virtues praise, That all both judge you to relate them true, And to possess them, honour'd Margaret. J. MILTON. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

Pages: default , 001 , 003 , 005 , 007 , 009 , 011 , 013 , 015 , 016 , 018 , 020 , 021 , 023 , 025 , 027 , 029 , 031 , 033 , 034 , 038 , 040 , 041 , 042 , 044 , 048 , 052 , 053 , 054 , 055 , 057 , 058 , 060 , 062 , 063 , 064 , 065 , 066 , 067 , 069 , 070 , 072 , 074 , 075 , 077 , 079 , 080 , 081 , 082 , 084 , 086 , 089 , 091 , 092 , 096 , 099 , 100 , 102 , 103 , 104 , 105 , 106 , 107 , 108 , 109 , 111 , 112 , 113 , 114 , 115 , 116 , 117 , 118 , 120 , 121 , 122 , 123 , 124 , 126 , 127 , 128 , 129 , 130 , 131 , 133 , 134 , 136 , 140 , 141 , 142 , 143 , 144 , 146 , 147 , 148 , 149 , 151 , 152 , 153 , 154 , 155 , 157 , 158 , 159 , 160 , 162 , 163 , 164 , 165 , 167 , 168 , 169 , 170 , 172 , 173 , 174 , 177 , 179 , 181 , 182 , 183 , 185 , 187 , 188 , 190 , 191 , 192 , 193 , 195 , 196 , 198 , 200 , 202 , 204 , 205 , 206 , 207 , 208 , 210 , 211 , 213 , 215 , 216 , 217 , 218 , 219 , 220 , 221 , 222 , 223 , 224 , 225 , 226 , 227 , 228 , 229 , 231 , 233 , 234 , 236 , 237 , 238 , 239 , 240 , 241 , 242 , 243 , 244 , 245 , 247 , 249 , 250 , 251 , 252 , 253 , 254 , 255 , 256 , 257 , 258 , 259 , 260 , 261 , 263 , 264 , 267 , 268 , 270 , 271 , 272 , 273 , 274 , 275 , 276 , 278 , 280 , 281 , 282 , 283 , 284 , 287 ,