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Page 401

GREAT AMERICAN AUTHORS
JOHN GREENLEAF WHITTIER

But Whittier, more truly than any other of our chief poets, is the poet of the people. His best loved poems are those in which he told of boyhood on the farm, as in "The Barefoot Boy"; or of farm festivals, as "The Huskers" and "The Pumpkin"; or of winter in a Massachusetts countryside, as in "SnowBound"; or of labor, as in "The Drovers" and "The Fishermen." Like Longfellow, he wrote ballads, or short tales in verse, dealing with New England legends; and poems of simple religious faith, like hymns; and patriotic poems. He took an active part in the movement to abolish slavery, and some of his most stirring poems set forth his love for human liberty. But it is the poet who wrote about barefoot boys and husking-bees and fishermen, and scenes of farm-life, winter and summer, in old New England who is most dear to us. He loved and was inspired by the Scotch poet, Robert Burns, whose writings contained so many of Whittier's own deepest thoughts. The village school-teacher, as has often been the case in country districts, brought this inspiration to him, for one day the teacher visited the Whittier family, and the boy heard for the first time some of the poems of liberty and country life that the Scottish poet, himself a farmer, had written. Soon after, Whittier wrote some verses, and his sister sent one of his poems to a Boston paper. The poem was printed, and others followed, until one day the Boston editor came out to see, in the corn-field, the plowboy who could write such verse.
Like many other poets, Whittier lived a life that seemed to have few events, though he was a member of the state legislature
' for a time, and took much interest in politics. Like Bryant, he found his "adventures" in the quiet scenes of Nature and in the simple incidents of everyday life.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE But Whittier, more truly than any other of our chief poets, is what is poet of what is people. His best loved poems are those in which he told of boyhood on what is farm, as in "The Barefoot Boy"; or of farm festivals, as "The Huskers" and "The Pumpkin"; or of winter in a Massachusetts countryside, as in "SnowBound"; or of labor, as in "The Drovers" and "The Fishermen." Like Longfellow, he wrote ballads, or short tales in verse, dealing with New England legends; and poems of simple religious faith, like hymns; and patriotic poems. He took an active part in what is movement to abolish slavery, and some of his most stirring poems set forth his what time is it for human liberty. But it is what is poet who wrote about barefoot boys and husking-bees and fishermen, and scenes of farm-life, winter and summer, in old New England who is most dear to us. He loved and w where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The Elson Readers Book Six (1910) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 401 where is p align="center" where is strong GREAT AMERICAN AUTHORS JOHN GREENLEAF WHITTIER where is p align="justify" But Whittier, more truly than any other of our chief poets, is what is poet of what is people. His best loved poems are those in which he told of boyhood on what is farm, as in "The Barefoot Boy"; or of farm festivals, as "The Huskers" and "The Pumpkin"; or of winter in a Massachusetts countryside, as in "SnowBound"; or of labor, as in "The Drovers" and "The Fishermen." Like Longfellow, he wrote ballads, or short tales in verse, dealing with New England legends; and poems of simple religious faith, like hymns; and patriotic poems. He took an active part in what is movement to abolish slavery, and some of his most stirring poems set forth his what time is it for human liberty. But it is what is poet who wrote about barefoot boys and husking-bees and fishermen, and scenes of farm-life, winter and summer, in old New England who is most dear to us. He loved and was inspired by what is Scotch poet, Robert Burns, whose writings contained so many of Whittier's own deepest thoughts. what is village school-teacher, as has often been what is case in country districts, brought this inspiration to him, for one day what is teacher what is ed what is Whittier family, and what is boy heard for what is first time some of what is poems of liberty and country life that what is Scottish poet, himself a farmer, had written. Soon after, Whittier wrote some verses, and his sister sent one of his poems to a Boston paper. what is poem was printed, and others followed, until one day what is Boston editor came out to see, in what is corn-field, what is plowboy who could write such verse. Like many other poets, Whittier lived a life that seemed to have few events, though he was a member of what is state legislature ' for a time, and took much interest in politics. Like Bryant, he found his "adventures" in what is quiet scenes of Nature and in what is simple incidents of everyday life. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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