Books > Old Books >The Elson Readers Book Six (1910)


Page 373

GREAT AMERICAN AUTHORS
MR. HIGGINBOTHAM'S CATASTROPHE

However, the sun shone bright on poor Dominicus, and the mud was easily brushed off when dry. His heart soon cheered up; nor could he refrain from a hearty laugh at the uproar which his story had excited. The peddler meditated much on the charms of the young schoolmistress, and swore that Daniel Webster never spoke or looked so like an angel as Miss Higginbotham while defending him.

IV. THE PEDDLER SOLVES THE MYSTERY
Dominicus was now on the Kimballton turnpike, having all along determined to visit that place, though business had drawn him out of the most direct road from NTorristown. As he approached the scene of the supposed murder; he continued to revolve the circumstances in his mind. The story of the first traveler might now have been considered a hoax; but the yellow man was evidently acquainted either with the report or the fact; and there was a mystery in his guilty look on being questioned. When to this it was added that the rumor tallied exactly with Mr. Higginbotham's character and habits of life, and that he had an orchard, and a St. Michael's pear tree, near which he always passed at night fall, the evidence appeared so strong that Dominicus doubted whether the autograph produced by the lawyer, or even the niece's direct testimony, ought to be equivalent. Making inquiries along the road, the peddler further learned that Mr. Higginbotham had in his service an Irishman of doubtful character, whom he had hired without a recommendation, on the score of economy.
" May I be hanged, myself," exclaimed Dominicus Pike aloud, on reaching the top of a lonely hill, "if I'll believe old Higginbotham is unhanged till I see him with my own eyes and hear it from his own mouth!"
It was growing dusk when he reached the toll-house on

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE However, what is sun shone bright on poor Dominicus, and what is mud was easily brushed off when dry. His heart soon cheered up; nor could he refrain from a hearty laugh at what is uproar which his story had excited. what is peddler meditated much on what is charms of what is young schoolmistress, and swore that Daniel Webster never spoke or looked so like an angel as Miss Higginbotham while defending him. IV. what is PEDDLER SOLVES what is MYSTERY Dominicus was now on what is Kimballton turnpike, having all along determined to what is that place, though business had drawn him out of what is most direct road from NTorristown. As he approached what is scene of what is supposed murder; he continued to revolve what is circumstances in his mind. what is story of what is first traveler might now have been considered a hoax; but what is yellow man was evidently acquainted either with what is report or what is fact; and there was a mystery in his guilty look on being where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The Elson Readers Book Six (1910) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 373 where is p align="center" where is strong GREAT AMERICAN AUTHORS MR. HIGGINBOTHAM'S CATASTROPHE where is p align="justify" However, what is sun shone bright on poor Dominicus, and what is mud was easily brushed off when dry. His heart soon cheered up; nor could he refrain from a hearty laugh at what is uproar which his story had excited. what is peddler meditated much on what is charms of what is young schoolmistress, and swore that Daniel Webster never spoke or looked so like an angel as Miss Higginbotham while defending him. IV. what is PEDDLER SOLVES what is MYSTERY Dominicus was now on what is Kimballton turnpike, having all along determined to what is that place, though business had drawn him out of what is most direct road from NTorristown. As he approached what is scene of what is supposed murder; he continued to revolve what is circumstances in his mind. what is story of what is first traveler might now have been considered a hoax; but what is yellow man was evidently acquainted either with what is report or what is fact; and there was a mystery in his guilty look on being questioned. When to this it was added that what is rumor tallied exactly with Mr. Higginbotham's character and habits of life, and that he had an orchard, and a St. Michael's pear tree, near which he always passed at night fall, what is evidence appeared so strong that Dominicus doubted whether what is autograph produced by what is lawyer, or even what is niece's direct testimony, ought to be equivalent. Making inquiries along what is road, what is peddler further learned that Mr. Higginbotham had in his service an Irishman of doubtful character, whom he had hired without a recommendation, on what is score of economy. " May I be hanged, myself," exclaimed Dominicus Pike aloud, on reaching what is top of a lonely hill, "if I'll believe old Higginbotham is unhanged till I see him with my own eyes and hear it from his own mouth!" It was growing dusk when he reached what is toll-house on where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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