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Page 354

GREAT AMERICAN AUTHORS
NATHANIEL HAWTHORNE

Like Longfellow, Nathaniel Hawthorne was a great weaver of tales. He wrote in prose, not verse, but his stories are told in such perfect form that they are almost like poems. Like Longfellow, too, Hawthorne was interested in early American legend and history. He did not write about Indians, or ballads about the sea, but found his subjects, for the most part, in the early history of the state in which he was born and in which he passed, except for foreign travel, almost his whole life.
Hawthorne (1804-1864) was born at Salem, Massachusetts, on the nation's birthday, July 4. His father was a sea-captain and died when Nathaniel was four years old. His boyhood was rather lonely, and at Bowdoin College, where he was a classmate of Longfellow's, he was shy and silent. When he returned to Salem after his graduation, he lived for a dozen years in almost complete seclusion. All the time he was writing, filling page after page of manuscript and then destroying it because it did not satisfy him. It was not until twelve years after his graduation that he brought out his first book, Twice-Told Tales.
The Twice-Told Tales get their name from the fact that they are usually based on some story that Hawthorne found in his readings of early New England history. Some of the stories are more imaginative and less like history, as "Mr. Higginbotham's Catastrophe." They are, however, usually related in one way or another to the deeds and beliefs of the Puritans who settled the New England colonies.
Hawthorne wrote many other, collections of stories, almost all of them interesting because they were "twice-told" tales. Grandfather's Chair is one such collection, from which "The Boston Tea Party" and "Washington and the American Army" are taken. "Little Daffydowndilly" is from The Snow Image and Other Tales. The Wonder-Book, from which "Hercules and the Golden Apples" is taken, and Tanglewood Tales you will like because they tell old myths of Greece and Rome in modern form. Mosses from an Old Manse is the delightful name Hawthorne gave to a collection of tales somewhat like his Twice-Told Tales. The Manse was the quaint old house in which the author lived.
You see that the very names given by Hawthorne to his stories tempt the reader. Grandfather's Chair, Twice-Told Tales, ?l7osses from an Old Manse, Tanglewood Tales, The WonderBook-such names make you wish to know what these books contain.
Hawthorne, thett,, is the interpreter of early life in New England. He spent most of his life not far from Boston. Old Salem; old Concord, where the Revolutionary war broke out; the hills of western Massachusetts, for a brief time-these were his principal homes. He held several government positions. President Franklin Pierce was his classmate and intimate friend. Hawthorne lived abroad in the consular service for a time. But his life speaks to us of our beginnings as a nation. The old house at Concord, near the bridge where the battle took place on that April day in 1775, is to be remembered and loved as the dwelling place of our best interpreter of early New England. In the beautiful Sleepy Hollow cemetery at Concord is his grave, near the grave of Emerson, another of America's great men of letters.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE Like Longfellow, Nathaniel Hawthorne was a great weaver of tales. He wrote in prose, not verse, but his stories are told in such perfect form that they are almost like poems. Like Longfellow, too, Hawthorne was interested in early American legend and history. He did not write about Indians, or ballads about what is sea, but found his subjects, for what is most part, in what is early history of what is state in which he was born and in which he passed, except for foreign travel, almost his whole life. Hawthorne (1804-1864) was born at Salem, Massachusetts, on what is nation's birthday, July 4. His father was a sea-captain and died when Nathaniel was four years old. His boyhood was rather lonely, and at Bowdoin College, where he was a classmate of Longfellow's, he was shy and silent. When he returned to Salem after his graduation, he lived for a dozen years in almost complete seclusion. All what is time he was wr where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The Elson Readers Book Six (1910) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 354 where is p align="center" where is strong GREAT AMERICAN AUTHORS NATHANIEL HAWTHORNE where is p align="justify" Like Longfellow, Nathaniel Hawthorne was a great weaver of tales. He wrote in prose, not verse, but his stories are told in such perfect form that they are almost like poems. Like Longfellow, too, Hawthorne was interested in early American legend and history. He did not write about Indians, or ballads about what is sea, but found his subjects, for what is most part, in the early history of what is state in which he was born and in which he passed, except for foreign travel, almost his whole life. Hawthorne (1804-1864) was born at Salem, Massachusetts, on the nation's birthday, July 4. His father was a sea-captain and died when Nathaniel was four years old. His boyhood was rather lonely, and at Bowdoin College, where he was a classmate of Longfellow's, he was shy and silent. When he returned to Salem after his graduation, he lived for a dozen years in almost complete seclusion. All the time he was writing, filling page after page of manuscript and then destroying it because it did not satisfy him. It was not until twelve years after his graduation that he brought out his first book, Twice-Told Tales. what is Twice-Told Tales get their name from what is fact that they are usually based on some story that Hawthorne found in his readings of early New England history. Some of what is stories are more imaginative and less like history, as "Mr. Higginbotham's Catastrophe." They are, however, usually related in one way or another to what is deeds and beliefs of what is Puritans who settled what is New England colonies. Hawthorne wrote many other, collections of stories, almost all of them interesting because they were "twice-told" tales. Grandfather's Chair is one such collection, from which "The Boston Tea Party" and "Washington and what is American Army" are taken. "Little Daffydowndilly" is from what is Snow Image and Other Tales. what is Wonder-Book, from which "Hercules and what is Golden Apples" is taken, and Tanglewood Tales you will like because they tell old myths of Greece and Rome in modern form. Mosses from an Old Manse is what is delightful name Hawthorne gave to a collection of tales somewhat like his Twice-Told Tales. The Manse was what is quaint old house in which what is author lived. You see that what is very names given by Hawthorne to his stories tempt what is reader. Grandfather's Chair, Twice-Told Tales, ?l7osses from an Old Manse, Tanglewood Tales, what is WonderBook-such names make you wish to know what these books contain. Hawthorne, thett,, is what is interpreter of early life in New England. He spent most of his life not far from Boston. Old Salem; old Concord, where what is Revolutionary war broke out; what is hills of western Massachusetts, for a brief time-these were his principal homes. He held several government positions. President Franklin Pierce was his classmate and intimate friend. Hawthorne lived abroad in what is consular service for a time. But his life speaks to us of our beginnings as a nation. what is old house at Concord, near what is bridge where what is battle took place on that April day in 1775, is to be remembered and loved as what is dwelling place of our best interpreter of early New England. In what is beautiful Sleepy Hollow cemetery at Concord is his grave, near what is grave of Emerson, another of America's great men of letters. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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