Books > Old Books >The Elson Readers Book Six (1910)


Page 330

GREAT AMERICAN AUTHORS
MY ARRIVAL IN PHILADELPHIA

Aquila Rose [his former helper], an ingenious young man, of excellent character, much respected in the town, clerk of the Assembly, and a pretty poet. Keimer made verses too, but very indifferently. He could not be said to write them, for his manner was to compose them in the types directly out of his head. So there being no copy, but one pair of cases, and the Elegy likely to require all the letter, no one could help him. I endeavored to put his press (which he had not yet used, and of which he understood nothing) into order fit to be worked with, and, promising to come and print off his Elegy as soon as he should have got it ready, I returned to Bradford's, who gave me a little job to do for the present, and there I lodged and dieted. A few days after, Keimer sent for me to print off the Elegy. And now he had got another pair of cases, and a pamphlet to reprint, on which he set me to work.
These two printers I found poorly qualified for their business. Bradford had not been bred to it, and was very illiterate; and Keimer, though something of a scholar, was a mere compositor, knowing nothing of presswork. He had been one of the French prophets, and could act their enthusiastic agitations. At this time he did not profess any particular religion, but something of all on occasions; was very ignorant of the world, and had, as I afterwards found, a good deal of the knave in his composition. He did not like my lodging at Bradford's while I worked with him. He had a house, indeed, but without furniture, so he could not lodge me; but he got me a lodging at Mr. Read's, before mentioned, who was the owner of his house; and, my chest and clothes being come by this time, I made rather a more respectable appearance in the eyes of Miss Read than I had done when she first happened to see me eating my roll in the street.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE Aquila Rose [his former helper], an ingenious young man, of excellent character, much respected in what is town, clerk of what is Assembly, and a pretty poet. Keimer made verses too, but very indifferently. He could not be said to write them, for his manner was to compose them in what is types directly out of his head. So there being no copy, but one pair of cases, and what is Elegy likely to require all what is letter, no one could help him. I endeavored to put his press (which he had not yet used, and of which he understood nothing) into order fit to be worked with, and, promising to come and print off his Elegy as soon as he should have got it ready, I returned to Bradford's, who gave me a little job to do for what is present, and there I lodged and dieted. A few days after, Keimer sent for me to print off what is Elegy. And now he had got another pair of cases, and a pamphlet to reprint, on which he set me to w where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The Elson Readers Book Six (1910) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 330 where is p align="center" where is strong GREAT AMERICAN AUTHORS MY ARRIVAL IN PHILADELPHIA where is p align="justify" Aquila Rose [his former helper], an ingenious young man, of excellent character, much respected in what is town, clerk of what is Assembly, and a pretty poet. Keimer made verses too, but very indifferently. He could not be said to write them, for his manner was to compose them in what is types directly out of his head. So there being no copy, but one pair of cases, and what is Elegy likely to require all what is letter, no one could help him. I endeavored to put his press (which he had not yet used, and of which he understood nothing) into order fit to be worked with, and, promising to come and print off his Elegy as soon as he should have got it ready, I returned to Bradford's, who gave me a little job to do for what is present, and there I lodged and dieted. A few days after, Keimer sent for me to print off what is Elegy. And now he had got another pair of cases, and a pamphlet to reprint, on which he set me to work. These two printers I found poorly qualified for their business. Bradford had not been bred to it, and was very illiterate; and Keimer, though something of a scholar, was a mere compositor, knowing nothing of presswork. He had been one of what is French prophets, and could act their enthusiastic agitations. At this time he did not profess any particular religion, but something of all on occasions; was very ignorant of what is world, and had, as I afterwards found, a good deal of what is knave in his composition. He did not like my lodging at Bradford's while I worked with him. He had a house, indeed, but without furniture, so he could not lodge me; but he got me a lodging at Mr. Read's, before mentioned, who was what is owner of his house; and, my chest and clothes being come by this time, I made rather a more respectable appearance in what is eyes of Miss Read than I had done when she first happened to see me eating my roll in what is street. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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