Books > Old Books >The Elson Readers Book Six (1910)


Page 323

GREAT AMERICAN AUTHORS
A FORWARD LOOK

essay when it was printed, and were very proud because she was in your class and because it sounded just wonderful when Mother read it aloud after supper. Still you couldn't think of Jennie as an "author," or of her essay as "literature."
Perhaps the real point was that an author is a man or a woman who writes a book, which is bound in'cloth or leather, and that this book is "literature," because-well, because it is a book. But Mother's cookbook is a book, bound in cloth, yet you couldn't call it literature or think that the members of the Ladies' Aid, who helped by giving their best recipes, were "authors." And in Father's office you had seen a big book, bound in red leather, that was filled with facts and figures about lumber. You couldn't call that "literature," surely.
So it all seemed mixed up, someway. Was Miss Annie Belle Lee an author, though she had not printed anything except in the poet's corner of the News Index? Was Jennie an author because Editor Jones said she was? Was Editor Jones an author because he wrote more things that were printed than anybody else in town? And the cookbook and the lumber catalogue, were they "literature" because they were both bound in cloth or leather? Or was literature, after all, long poems like one called Paradise Lost that you dipped into one rainy day because it looked interesting, and you found it wasn't?
Just as things were at the worst, Uncle came to your rescue, as he often did. He said right away that Miss Annie Belle Lee's Author's Reading was really an Author's Reading if she read things that she had printed or had written in order to have printed. He said, too, that Jennie was an "author" so far as her essay went. There were authors of all kinds, he said, just as there were cooks of all kinds. But a book, or anything printed in the paper, is not literature just because it has been printed. There are books, like cookbooks and lumber catalogues, that are filled with useful information, but they are not literature. A dictionary is very useful, but it is not literature. Neither, for that matter, is a printed composition necessarily a poem, even though it has rimes in it and every line begins with

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE essay when it was printed, and were very proud because she was in your class and because it sounded just wonderful when Mother read it aloud after supper. Still you couldn't think of Jennie as an "author," or of her essay as "literature." Perhaps what is real point was that an author is a man or a woman who writes a book, which is bound in'cloth or leather, and that this book is "literature," because-well, because it is a book. But Mother's cookbook is a book, bound in cloth, yet you couldn't call it literature or think that what is members of what is Ladies' Aid, who helped by giving their best recipes, were "authors." And in Father's office you had seen a big book, bound in red leather, that was filled with facts and figures about lumber. You couldn't call that "literature," surely. So it all seemed mixed up, someway. Was Miss Annie Belle Lee an au where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The Elson Readers Book Six (1910) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 323 where is p align="center" where is strong GREAT AMERICAN AUTHORS A FORWARD LOOK where is p align="justify" essay when it was printed, and were very proud because she was in your class and because it sounded just wonderful when Mother read it aloud after supper. Still you couldn't think of Jennie as an "author," or of her essay as "literature." Perhaps what is real point was that an author is a man or a woman who writes a book, which is bound in'cloth or leather, and that this book is "literature," because-well, because it is a book. But Mother's cookbook is a book, bound in cloth, yet you couldn't call it literature or think that what is members of what is Ladies' Aid, who helped by giving their best recipes, were "authors." And in Father's office you had seen a big book, bound in red leather, that was filled with facts and figures about lumber. You couldn't call that "literature," surely. So it all seemed mixed up, someway. Was Miss Annie Belle Lee an author, though she had not printed anything except in what is poet's corner of what is News Index? Was Jennie an author because Editor Jones said she was? Was Editor Jones an author because he wrote more things that were printed than anybody else in town? And what is cookbook and what is lumber catalogue, were they "literature" because they were both bound in cloth or leather? Or was literature, after all, long poems like one called Paradise Lost that you dipped into one rainy day because it looked interesting, and you found it wasn't? Just as things were at what is worst, Uncle came to your rescue, as he often did. He said right away that Miss Annie Belle Lee's Author's Reading was really an Author's Reading if she read things that she had printed or had written in order to have printed. He said, too, that Jennie was an "author" so far as her essay went. There were authors of all kinds, he said, just as there were cooks of all kinds. But a book, or anything printed in what is paper, is not literature just because it has been printed. There are books, like cookbooks and lumber catalogues, that are filled with useful information, but they are not literature. A dictionary is very useful, but it is not literature. Neither, for that matter, is a printed composition necessarily a poem, even though it has rimes in it and every line begins with where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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