Books > Old Books >The Elson Readers Book Six (1910)


Page 318

STORIES OF GREECE AND ROME
A BACKWARD LOOK

You are familiar with your own city, county, and state, and through the Magic Wand of Reading you have come to know American life in general, especially its heroes and its ideals. A knowledge of America and all it stands for helps you to realize what it means to be a young American citizen. The Magic Wand has revealed to you a Greek and Roman pageant picturing worldstories. You are not alone as you sit enjoying the pageant, for all over the world boys and girls are reading these stories with you-in languages strange to you, but familiar to them.. How does the reading of these stories help to make you a world-citizen?
How many of the Greek and Roman gods can you describe from reading these stories? Which one of the heroes seems to you to have had the liveliest imagination? How did his power of imagination help him in his adventures? What has the reading of these stories done for your imagination?
When you see Hector defending his city with his very life, and see Aeneas fleeing from burning Troy, carrying Trojan ideals along with his household gods to a new and strange country, founding there the beginnings of the great Roman empire, you find it difficult to decide which is the greater patriot; discuss this topic in class. On page 211, a comparison is made between nations and trees; how does this apply to Rome? Where did the "seed" come from? Have you seen in newspapers or magazines references to these stories or to any of the heroes? Bring examples of this kind to class and aid in makihg a collection.
Find the lines on page 212 that give you a picture of Homer, the minstrel. Assign to each of your classmates one of the nineteen chapters of Part II, and allow them as minstrels, to review for you the stories of Achilles, Aeneas, and Ulysses, in this order. tiVhat progress did you note, as you read these stories, in your ability to gather ideas from the printed page at an increasing rate of speed? The artist selected a particular subject for each of the pictures on pages 213, 251, and 297 to illustrate the story; what other subjects can you suggest for this purpose?

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