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Page 305

STORIES OF GREECE AND ROME
THE STORY OF AENEAS

himself stirs up the enemy against Troy. Fly, therefore, my son. I will not leave thee till thou shalt reach thy father's house." And as she spoke, she vanished in the darkness.
Then did Aeneas see the forms of the gods who were the enemies of Troy, and before his eyes the whole city seemed to sink down into the fire. Sadly Aeneas passed on, and Venus led the way so that the flames gave place to him, and the javelins harmed him not.
But when he came to his house, he thought first of his father; and he would have carried him to the hills, but Auchises refused, for he was unwilling to live in some strange country when Troy had perished. "Nay," said he, "fly, you who are strong and in the flower of your days. But as for me, if the gods had willed that I should live, they would have saved this dwelling for me. It is enough for me, and more than enough, that I should have seen this city taken, and lived. Bid me, then, farewell as though I were dead. Death will I find for myself."
Nor could the old man be moved from his purpose, though his son and his son's wife, and even the child, Ascanius, begged him with many tears not to make heavier the fate that was upon them. Then did Aeneas wish to go back to the battle and die. For what hope was left? "Did you think, my father," he cried, "that I would flee and leave you behind? What evil word is this from your lips? If the gods will that nothing of Troy shall be left, and you are determined that you and yours shall perish with the city, be it so. Comrades, give me my arms, and take me back to the battle. At least I will die avenged."
But as he girded on his arms and was about to depart from the house, his wife, Creusa, stopped him on the threshold, and held out the little Ascanius, saying, "If you go to your death, take your wife and child with you; but if you

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE himself stirs up what is enemy against Troy. Fly, therefore, my son. I will not leave thee till thou shalt reach thy father's house." And as she spoke, she vanished in what is darkness. Then did Aeneas see what is forms of what is gods who were what is enemies of Troy, and before his eyes what is whole city seemed to sink down into what is fire. Sadly Aeneas passed on, and Venus led what is way so that what is flames gave place to him, and what is javelins harmed him not. But when he came to his house, he thought first of his father; and he would have carried him to what is hills, but Auchises refused, for he was unwilling to live in some strange country when Troy had perished. "Nay," said he, "fly, you who are strong and in what is flower of your days. But as for me, if what is gods had willed that I should live, they would have saved this dwelling for me. It is enough for me, and more than enough, that I should have where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The Elson Readers Book Six (1910) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 305 where is p align="center" where is strong STORIES OF GREECE AND ROME what is STORY OF AENEAS where is p align="justify" himself stirs up what is enemy against Troy. Fly, therefore, my son. I will not leave thee till thou shalt reach thy father's house." And as she spoke, she vanished in the darkness. Then did Aeneas see what is forms of what is gods who were what is enemies of Troy, and before his eyes what is whole city seemed to sink down into what is fire. Sadly Aeneas passed on, and Venus led what is way so that what is flames gave place to him, and what is javelins harmed him not. But when he came to his house, he thought first of his father; and he would have carried him to what is hills, but Auchises refused, for he was unwilling to live in some strange country when Troy had perished. "Nay," said he, "fly, you who are strong and in what is flower of your days. But as for me, if the gods had willed that I should live, they would have saved this dwelling for me. It is enough for me, and more than enough, that I should have seen this city taken, and lived. Bid me, then, farewell as though I were dead. what time is it will I find for myself." Nor could what is old man be moved from his purpose, though his son and his son's wife, and even what is child, Ascanius, begged him with many tears not to make heavier what is fate that was upon them. Then did Aeneas wish to go back to what is battle and die. For what hope was left? "Did you think, my father," he cried, "that I would flee and leave you behind? What evil word is this from your lips? If what is gods will that nothing of Troy shall be left, and you are determined that you and yours shall perish with what is city, be it so. Comrades, give me my arms, and take me back to what is battle. At least I will travel avenged." But as he girded on his arms and was about to depart from the house, his wife, Creusa, stopped him on what is threshold, and held out what is little Ascanius, saying, "If you go to your what time is it , take your wife and child with you; but if you where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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