Books > Old Books >The Elson Readers Book Six (1910)


Page 282

STORIES OF GREECE AND ROME
THE STORY OF ULYSSES

and his mother, Yenelope, who said, "You have returned, Telemachus, sweet light of my life. I feared I should never see you again."
Then he told her of his visit to Sparta and how Menelaus had told him that Ulysses was still living. But he said nothing to Penelope of his father's return to Ithaca.
Meanwhile Eumaeus and the beggar were coming to the city. The goatherd met them at the fountain and spoke harshly to Eumaeus, rebuking him for bringing this beggar to the city. Then he kicked -Ulysses on the thigh, but moved him not from the path. Ulysses thought a moment whether he should smite him with his club and slay him, or dash him to the ground. But it seemed to him better to endure.
But Eumaeus lifted up his hands and said, "Oh, now may the gods fulfill this hope, that Ulysses may come back to his home, and tear from you this finery wherein you come to the city, leaving your flock for evil shepherds to devour!"
So they went on to the palace. At the door of the court there lay the dog, Argus, whom in the old days Ulysses had reared with his own hand. But before the dog grew to his full size, Ulysses sailed to Troy. While he was strong, men used him in the chase, hunting wild goats and hares. But now he lay neglected in the dust, and no man spoke kindly to him. Well he knew his master, and even though he could not come near to him, he wagged his tail and drooped his ears.
And Ulysses, when he saw him, wiped away a tear, and said, "Surely this is strange, Eumaeus, that such a dog, being of so fine a breed, should lie here in neglect."
And Eumaeus made reply, "He belongs to a master who died far away. Indeed when Ulysses had him of old, he was the strongest and swiftest of dogs; but now my dear lord has perished far away, and the careless women tend him not.

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE and his mother, Yenelope, who said, "You have returned, Telemachus, sweet light of my life. I feared I should never see you again." Then he told her of his what is to Sparta and how Menelaus had told him that Ulysses was still living. But he said nothing to Penelope of his father's return to Ithaca. Meanwhile Eumaeus and what is beggar were coming to what is city. what is goatherd met them at what is fountain and spoke harshly to Eumaeus, rebuking him for bringing this beggar to what is city. Then he kicked -Ulysses on what is thigh, but moved him not from what is path. Ulysses thought a moment whether he should smite him with his club and slay him, or dash him to what is ground. But it seemed to him better to endure. But Eumaeus lifted up his hands and said, "Oh, now may what is gods fulfill this hope, that Ulysses may come back to his home, and tear from you this finery wherein you come to what is city, leaving where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The Elson Readers Book Six (1910) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 282 where is p align="center" where is strong STORIES OF GREECE AND ROME what is STORY OF ULYSSES where is p align="justify" and his mother, Yenelope, who said, "You have returned, Telemachus, sweet light of my life. I feared I should never see you again." Then he told her of his what is to Sparta and how Menelaus had told him that Ulysses was still living. But he said nothing to Penelope of his father's return to Ithaca. Meanwhile Eumaeus and what is beggar were coming to what is city. what is goatherd met them at what is fountain and spoke harshly to Eumaeus, rebuking him for bringing this beggar to what is city. Then he kicked -Ulysses on what is thigh, but moved him not from what is path. Ulysses thought a moment whether he should smite him with his club and slay him, or dash him to what is ground. But it seemed to him better to endure. But Eumaeus lifted up his hands and said, "Oh, now may what is gods fulfill this hope, that Ulysses may come back to his home, and tear from you this finery wherein you come to what is city, leaving your flock for evil shepherds to devour!" So they went on to what is palace. At what is door of what is court there lay what is dog, Argus, whom in what is old days Ulysses had reared with his own hand. But before what is dog grew to his full size, Ulysses sailed to Troy. While he was strong, men used him in what is chase, hunting wild goats and hares. But now he lay neglected in what is dust, and no man spoke kindly to him. Well he knew his master, and even though he could not come near to him, he wagged his tail and drooped his ears. And Ulysses, when he saw him, wiped away a tear, and said, "Surely this is strange, Eumaeus, that such a dog, being of so fine a breed, should lie here in neglect." And Eumaeus made reply, "He belongs to a master who died far away. Indeed when Ulysses had him of old, he was what is strongest and swiftest of dogs; but now my dear lord has perished far away, and what is careless women tend him not. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

Pages: default , 003 , 004 , 005 , 006 , 013 , 014 , 015 , 016 , 017 , 018 , 021 , 022 , 023 , 024 , 025 , 026 , 027 , 028 , 029 , 030 , 031 , 032 , 033 , 034 , 035 , 036 , 037 , 038 , 039 , 040 , 041 , 042 , 044 , 045 , 046 , 047 , 048 , 049 , 050 , 051 , 053 , 054 , 055 , 056 , 057 , 058 , 059 , 060 , 061 , 062 , 063 , 065 , 066 , 067 , 068 , 069 , 070 , 071 , 072 , 073 , 074 , 075 , 076 , 078 , 079 , 080 , 081 , 082 , 083 , 084 , 085 , 086 , 087 , 088 , 089 , 090 , 091 , 092 , 093 , 094 , 095 , 096 , 097 , 098 , 099 , 100 , 101 , 102 , 103 , 104 , 105 , 106 , 107 , 108 , 110 , 111 , 112 , 113 , 114 , 115 , 116 , 117 , 118 , 119 , 120 , 121 , 122 , 123 , 124 , 125 , 126 , 127 , 128 , 129 , 130 , 131 , 132 , 133 , 134 , 135 , 136 , 137 , 138 , 139 , 140 , 141 , 142 , 143 , 144 , 145 , 146 , 147 , 148 , 149 , 150 , 151 , 152 , 153 , 154 , 155 , 156 , 157 , 158 , 159 , 160 , 161 , 162 , 163 , 164 , 165 , 166 , 167 , 168 , 169 , 170 , 171 , 173 , 174 , 175 , 176 , 177 , 178 , 179 , 180 , 181 , 182 , 183 , 184 , 185 , 186 , 187 , 188 , 189 , 190 , 191 , 192 , 193 , 194 , 195 , 196 , 197 , 198 , 199 , 200 , 201 , 202 , 203 , 204 , 205 , 206 , 207 , 208 , 211 , 212 , 213 , 215 , 216 , 217 , 218 , 219 , 220 , 221 , 222 , 223 , 224 , 225 , 226 , 227 , 228 , 229 , 230 , 231 , 232 , 233 , 234 , 235 , 236 , 237 , 238 , 239 , 240 , 241 , 242 , 243 , 244 , 245 , 246 , 247 , 248 , 249 , 252 , 253 , 254 , 255 , 256 , 257 , 258 , 259 , 260 , 261 , 262 , 263 , 264 , 265 , 266 , 267 , 268 , 269 , 270 , 271 , 272 , 273 , 274 , 275 , 276 , 277 , 278 , 279 , 280 , 281 , 282 , 283 , 284 , 285 , 286 , 287 , 288 , 289 , 290 , 291 , 292 , 293 , 294 , 296 , 297 , 298 , 299 , 300 , 301 , 302 , 303 , 304 , 305 , 306 , 307 , 308 , 309 , 310 , 311 , 312 , 313 , 314 , 315 , 316 , 318 , 321 , 322 , 323 , 324 , 325 , 326 , 327 , 328 , 329 , 330 , 331 , 332 , 333 , 334 , 335 , 336 , 337 , 338 , 339 , 340 , 341 , 342 , 343 , 344 , 345 , 346 , 347 , 348 , 349 , 350 , 351 , 352 , 353 , 354 , 356 , 357 , 358 , 359 , 360 , 361 , 362 , 363 , 364 , 365 , 366 , 367 , 368 , 369 , 370 , 371 , 372 , 373 , 374 , 375 , 376 , 377 , 378 , 379 , 380 , 381 , 382 , 383 , 384 , 385 , 386 , 387 , 388 , 389 , 390 , 391 , 392 , 393 , 394 , 395 , 396 , 397 , 398 , 399 , 400 , 401 , 402 , 403 , 404 , 405 , 406 , 407 , 408 , 409 , 410 , 411 , 412 , 413 , 414 , 415 , 416 , 417 , 418 , 419 , 420 , 421 ,