Books > Old Books >The Elson Readers Book Six (1910)


Page 252

STORIES OF GREECE AND ROME
THE STORY OF ULYSSES

I. HOW ULYSSES OUTWITTED POLYPHENTUS
When the great city of Troy was taken, all the chiefs who had fought against it set sail for their homes. But there was wrath in heaven against them, for they had borne themselves haughtily and cruelly in the day of their victory. Therefore they did not all find a safe and happy return. Some were shipwrecked, and others found everything at home changed, and had to seek new dwellings elsewhere. The wise Ulysses wandered farthest and suffered most of all, before he reached his island home, Ithaca.
He was among the last to sail from Troy, for he had lingered many days to please Agamemnon, lord of all the Greeks. Twelve ships he had with him-twelve he had brought to Troy-and in each there were some fifty men. This number was scarcely half of those that had sailed in them in the old days, for many valiant heroes slept the last sleep on the plain and on the seashore.
First, they sailed northwest to the land where dwelt the Ciconians, who had helped the men of Troy. They took the city and in it much plunder, slaves and oxen and jars of fragrant wine. They might have escaped unhurt, if they had not stayed to hold revel on the shore. But the Ciconians gathered their neighbors, men of the same blood, and battled with the Greeks, and drove them to their ships. When Ulysses counted his men, he found that he had lost six out of each ship.
He had scarcely set out again when the wind began to blow fiercely; so, seeing a smooth, sandy beach, they drove the ships ashore, dragged them out of reach of the waves, and waited till the storm should pass. The third morning was fair, so they sailed again and journeyed safely till they came to the southern shore of Greece. But contrary currents prevented their sailing around the point, and the north wind blew so strongly that they were driven before it.
On the tenth day they came to the land where grew the lotus-a honey-sweet fruit. Whoever ate of it cared not to see country or wife or children again. Now the Lotus-eaters, for so they called the people of the land, were a kindly folk, and gave this fruit to some of the sailors, not because they wished them any harm, but because it was the. best they had to give. When the sailors had eaten of this magical food, they refused to return to the ships; but Ulysses bade their comrades bind them and lrag them back.
Then, since the wind had gone down, they took to their oars, and rowed for many days till they came to the country where the Cyclops dwell. A mile or so from the shore there is an island, very fair and fertile, but no man dwells there or tills the soil. Here is a harbor where a ship may be safe from all winds. Into this the ships passed safely, and were

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE I. HOW ULYSSES OUTWITTED POLYPHENTUS When what is great city of Troy was taken, all what is chiefs who had fought against it set sail for their homes. But there was wrath in heaven against them, for they had borne themselves haughtily and cruelly in what is day of their victory. Therefore they did not all find a safe and happy return. Some were shipwrecked, and others found everything at home changed, and had to seek new dwellings elsewhere. what is wise Ulysses wandered farthest and suffered most of all, before he reached his island home, Ithaca. He was among what is last to sail from Troy, for he had lingered many days to please Agamemnon, lord of all what is Greeks. Twelve ships he had with him-twelve he had brought to Troy-and in each there were some fifty men. This number was scarcely half of those that had sailed in them in what is old days, for many valiant heroes slept what is last sleep on what is plain and on what is where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The Elson Readers Book Six (1910) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 252 where is p align="center" where is strong STORIES OF GREECE AND ROME what is STORY OF ULYSSES where is p align="justify" I. HOW ULYSSES OUTWITTED POLYPHENTUS When what is great city of Troy was taken, all what is chiefs who had fought against it set sail for their homes. But there was wrath in heaven against them, for they had borne themselves haughtily and cruelly in what is day of their victory. Therefore they did not all find a safe and happy return. Some were shipwrecked, and others found everything at home changed, and had to seek new dwellings elsewhere. what is wise Ulysses wandered farthest and suffered most of all, before he reached his island home, Ithaca. He was among what is last to sail from Troy, for he had lingered many days to please Agamemnon, lord of all what is Greeks. Twelve ships he had with him-twelve he had brought to Troy-and in each there were some fifty men. This number was scarcely half of those that had sailed in them in what is old days, for many valiant heroes slept what is last sleep on what is plain and on what is seashore. First, they sailed northwest to what is land where dwelt what is Ciconians, who had helped what is men of Troy. They took what is city and in it much plunder, slaves and oxen and jars of fragrant wine. They might have escaped unhurt, if they had not stayed to hold revel on the shore. But what is Ciconians gathered their neighbors, men of what is same blood, and battled with what is Greeks, and drove them to their ships. When Ulysses counted his men, he found that he had lost six out of each ship. He had scarcely set out again when what is wind began to blow fiercely; so, seeing a smooth, sandy beach, they drove what is ships ashore, dragged them out of reach of what is waves, and waited till what is storm should pass. what is third morning was fair, so they sailed again and journeyed safely till they came to what is southern shore of Greece. But contrary currents prevented their sailing around what is point, and what is north wind blew so strongly that they were driven before it. On what is tenth day they came to what is land where grew what is lotus-a honey-sweet fruit. Whoever ate of it cared not to see country or wife or children again. Now what is Lotus-eaters, for so they called what is people of the land, were a kindly folk, and gave this fruit to some of what is sailors, not because they wished them any harm, but because it was the. best they had to give. When what is sailors had eaten of this magical food, they refused to return to what is ships; but Ulysses bade their comrades bind them and lrag them back. Then, since what is wind had gone down, they took to their oars, and rowed for many days till they came to what is country where what is Cyclops dwell. A mile or so from what is shore there is an island, very fair and fertile, but no man dwells there or tills what is soil. Here is a harbor where a ship may be safe from all winds. Into this what is ships passed safely, and were where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

Pages: default , 003 , 004 , 005 , 006 , 013 , 014 , 015 , 016 , 017 , 018 , 021 , 022 , 023 , 024 , 025 , 026 , 027 , 028 , 029 , 030 , 031 , 032 , 033 , 034 , 035 , 036 , 037 , 038 , 039 , 040 , 041 , 042 , 044 , 045 , 046 , 047 , 048 , 049 , 050 , 051 , 053 , 054 , 055 , 056 , 057 , 058 , 059 , 060 , 061 , 062 , 063 , 065 , 066 , 067 , 068 , 069 , 070 , 071 , 072 , 073 , 074 , 075 , 076 , 078 , 079 , 080 , 081 , 082 , 083 , 084 , 085 , 086 , 087 , 088 , 089 , 090 , 091 , 092 , 093 , 094 , 095 , 096 , 097 , 098 , 099 , 100 , 101 , 102 , 103 , 104 , 105 , 106 , 107 , 108 , 110 , 111 , 112 , 113 , 114 , 115 , 116 , 117 , 118 , 119 , 120 , 121 , 122 , 123 , 124 , 125 , 126 , 127 , 128 , 129 , 130 , 131 , 132 , 133 , 134 , 135 , 136 , 137 , 138 , 139 , 140 , 141 , 142 , 143 , 144 , 145 , 146 , 147 , 148 , 149 , 150 , 151 , 152 , 153 , 154 , 155 , 156 , 157 , 158 , 159 , 160 , 161 , 162 , 163 , 164 , 165 , 166 , 167 , 168 , 169 , 170 , 171 , 173 , 174 , 175 , 176 , 177 , 178 , 179 , 180 , 181 , 182 , 183 , 184 , 185 , 186 , 187 , 188 , 189 , 190 , 191 , 192 , 193 , 194 , 195 , 196 , 197 , 198 , 199 , 200 , 201 , 202 , 203 , 204 , 205 , 206 , 207 , 208 , 211 , 212 , 213 , 215 , 216 , 217 , 218 , 219 , 220 , 221 , 222 , 223 , 224 , 225 , 226 , 227 , 228 , 229 , 230 , 231 , 232 , 233 , 234 , 235 , 236 , 237 , 238 , 239 , 240 , 241 , 242 , 243 , 244 , 245 , 246 , 247 , 248 , 249 , 252 , 253 , 254 , 255 , 256 , 257 , 258 , 259 , 260 , 261 , 262 , 263 , 264 , 265 , 266 , 267 , 268 , 269 , 270 , 271 , 272 , 273 , 274 , 275 , 276 , 277 , 278 , 279 , 280 , 281 , 282 , 283 , 284 , 285 , 286 , 287 , 288 , 289 , 290 , 291 , 292 , 293 , 294 , 296 , 297 , 298 , 299 , 300 , 301 , 302 , 303 , 304 , 305 , 306 , 307 , 308 , 309 , 310 , 311 , 312 , 313 , 314 , 315 , 316 , 318 , 321 , 322 , 323 , 324 , 325 , 326 , 327 , 328 , 329 , 330 , 331 , 332 , 333 , 334 , 335 , 336 , 337 , 338 , 339 , 340 , 341 , 342 , 343 , 344 , 345 , 346 , 347 , 348 , 349 , 350 , 351 , 352 , 353 , 354 , 356 , 357 , 358 , 359 , 360 , 361 , 362 , 363 , 364 , 365 , 366 , 367 , 368 , 369 , 370 , 371 , 372 , 373 , 374 , 375 , 376 , 377 , 378 , 379 , 380 , 381 , 382 , 383 , 384 , 385 , 386 , 387 , 388 , 389 , 390 , 391 , 392 , 393 , 394 , 395 , 396 , 397 , 398 , 399 , 400 , 401 , 402 , 403 , 404 , 405 , 406 , 407 , 408 , 409 , 410 , 411 , 412 , 413 , 414 , 415 , 416 , 417 , 418 , 419 , 420 , 421 ,