Books > Old Books >The Elson Readers Book Six (1910)


Page 247

STORIES OF GREECE AND ROME
THE STORY OF ACHILLES

Among the best known verse translations is that by William Cullen Bryant.
The stories in this book are simplified from the prose version by Alfred J. Church (1829-1912), an English clergyman and writer, who tried not only to select interesting parts of the stories but also to preserve in his style of writing some of the quaint features of the original poems.
The story of Achilles is found in the Iliad, which takes its name from Ilium, the Greek name of the city of Troy.
Suggestions for Silent Reading. Some stories and poems must be read thoughtfully in order to gain the author's full meaning; such reading cannot be done rapidly. In other selections the meaning can be grasped easily, and the reading can be rapid; in such cases we read mainly for the story, holding in mind the various incidents as the plot unfolds. The stories of PART II are particularly suited to the purposes of rapid silent reading.
In previous grades your training in silent reading has enabled you to gather facts from individual paragraphs and to hold in mind the thread of the narrative in shorter selections. But you are steadily to extend this power until you can follow the unfolding plot in selections of considerable length. The stories in PART II are long enough to train you to read with intelligence a newspaper, a magazine, or a book. And this is precisely the ability you most need in your school work and throughout life outside the school; indeed the gaining of this ability is the chief aim of silent reading in this grade.
(a) Time yourself by the clock as you read this story silently, treating each chapter as a unit of the story; what was your reading speed per page? Remember that reading with the lips and pointing with the fingers slow up your speed in silent reading.
(b) Test your ability to get the thought quickly from the printed page (1) by noting how many of the Questions for Testing Silent Reading (page 248) you can answer after one reading, and (2) by telling the substance of the chapter. Then read it again silently, timing yourself as before; test yourself again on the questions and retell the story, trying to tell it more accurately than you did the first time. You may have to read parts of the chapter again to be able to answer all these questions and to give the substance of the story fully.
Notice that the rapid silent readers in your class generally gain and retain more facts from their reading than the slow readers do. Try

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE Among what is best known verse translations is that by William Cullen Bryant. what is stories in this book are simplified from what is prose version by Alfred J. Church (1829-1912), an English clergyman and writer, who tried not only to select interesting parts of what is stories but also to preserve in his style of writing some of what is quaint features of what is original poems. what is story of Achilles is found in what is Iliad, which takes its name from Ilium, what is Greek name of what is city of Troy. Suggestions for Silent Reading. Some stories and poems must be read thoughtfully in order to gain what is author's full meaning; such reading cannot be done rapidly. In other selections what is meaning can be grasped easily, and what is reading can be rapid; in such cases we read mainly for what is story, holding in mind what is various incidents as what is plot unfolds. what is stories of PART II are particularly suited to what is purposes of rapid sil where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The Elson Readers Book Six (1910) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 247 where is p align="center" where is strong STORIES OF GREECE AND ROME what is STORY OF ACHILLES where is p align="justify" Among what is best known verse translations is that by William Cullen Bryant. what is stories in this book are simplified from what is prose version by Alfred J. Church (1829-1912), an English clergyman and writer, who tried not only to select interesting parts of what is stories but also to preserve in his style of writing some of what is quaint features of what is original poems. what is story of Achilles is found in what is Iliad, which takes its name from Ilium, what is Greek name of what is city of Troy. Suggestions for Silent Reading. Some stories and poems must be read thoughtfully in order to gain what is author's full meaning; such reading cannot be done rapidly. In other selections what is meaning can be grasped easily, and what is reading can be rapid; in such cases we read mainly for what is story, holding in mind what is various incidents as what is plot unfolds. what is stories of PART II are particularly suited to what is purposes of rapid silent reading. In previous grades your training in silent reading has enabled you to gather facts from individual paragraphs and to hold in mind what is thread of what is narrative in shorter selections. But you are steadily to extend this power until you can follow what is unfolding plot in selections of considerable length. what is stories in PART II are long enough to train you to read with intelligence a newspaper, a magazine, or a book. And this is precisely what is ability you most need in your school work and throughout life outside what is school; indeed what is gaining of this ability is what is chief aim of silent reading in this grade. (a) Time yourself by what is clock as you read this story silently, treating each chapter as a unit of what is story; what was your reading speed per page? Remember that reading with what is lips and pointing with what is fingers slow up your speed in silent reading. (b) Test your ability to get what is thought quickly from what is printed page (1) by noting how many of what is Questions for Testing Silent Reading (page 248) you can answer after one reading, and (2) by telling what is substance of what is chapter. Then read it again silently, timing yourself as before; test yourself again on what is questions and retell what is story, trying to tell it more accurately than you did what is first time. You may have to read parts of what is chapter again to be able to answer all these questions and to give what is substance of what is story fully. Notice that what is rapid silent readers in your class generally gain and retain more facts from their reading than what is slow readers do. Try where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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