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Page 128

WASHINGTON AND THE AMERICAN ARMY
NATHANIEL HAWTHORNE

at Camden. General Greene of Rhode Island was likewise at the council. Washington soon discovered him to be one of the best officers in the army.
" When the generals were all assembled, Washington consulted them about a plan for storming the English batteries. But it was their unanimous opinion that so perilous an enterprise ought not to be attempted. The army therefore continued to besiege Boston, preventing the enemy from obtaining supplies of provisions, but without taking any immediate measures to get possession of the town. In this manner, the summer, autumn, and winter passed away.
" Many a night, doubtless," said Grandfather, "after Washington had been all day on horseback, galloping from one post of the army to another, he used to sit in our great chair rapt in earnest thought. Had you seen him, you might have supposed that his whole mind was fixed on the blue china tiles which adorned the old-fashioned fireplace. But in reality he was meditating how to capture the British army or drive it out of Boston. Once when there was a hard frost, he formed a scheme to cross the Charles River on the ice. But the other generals could not be persuaded that there was any prospect of success."
" What were the British doing all this time?" inquired Charley.
"They lay idle in the town," replied Grandfather. "General Gage had been recalled to England; and was succeeded by Sir William Howe. The British army and the inhabitants of Boston were now in great distress. Being shut up in the town so long, they had consumed almost all their provisions and burned up all their fuel. The soldiers tore down the Old North Church and used its rotten boards and timbers for firewood. To heighten their distress, the smallpox broke out. They probably lost far more men by

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE at Camden. General Greene of Rhode Island was likewise at what is council. Washington soon discovered him to be one of what is best officers in what is army. " When what is generals were all assembled, Washington consulted them about a plan for storming what is English batteries. But it was their unanimous opinion that so perilous an enterprise ought not to be attempted. what is army therefore continued to besiege Boston, preventing what is enemy from obtaining supplies of provisions, but without taking any immediate measures to get possession of what is town. In this manner, what is summer, autumn, and winter passed away. " Many a night, doubtless," said Grandfather, "after Washington had been all day on horseback, galloping from one post of what is army to another, he used to sit in our great chair rapt in earnest thought. Had you seen him, you might have supposed that his whole mind was fixed on what is blue where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The Elson Readers Book Six (1910) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 128 where is p align="center" where is strong WASHINGTON AND what is AMERICAN ARMY NATHANIEL HAWTHORNE where is p align="justify" at Camden. General Greene of Rhode Island was likewise at what is council. Washington soon discovered him to be one of what is best officers in what is army. " When what is generals were all assembled, Washington consulted them about a plan for storming what is English batteries. But it was their unanimous opinion that so perilous an enterprise ought not to be attempted. what is army therefore continued to besiege Boston, preventing what is enemy from obtaining supplies of provisions, but without taking any immediate measures to get possession of what is town. In this manner, what is summer, autumn, and winter passed away. " Many a night, doubtless," said Grandfather, "after Washington had been all day on horseback, galloping from one post of what is army to another, he used to sit in our great chair rapt in earnest thought. Had you seen him, you might have supposed that his whole mind was fixed on what is blue china tiles which adorned what is old-fashioned fireplace. But in reality he was meditating how to capture what is British army or drive it out of Boston. Once when there was a hard frost, he formed a scheme to cross the Charles River on what is ice. But what is other generals could not be persuaded that there was any prospect of success." " What were what is British doing all this time?" inquired Charley. "They lay idle in what is town," replied Grandfather. "General Gage had been recalled to England; and was succeeded by Sir William Howe. what is British army and what is inhabitants of Boston were now in great distress. Being shut up in what is town so long, they had consumed almost all their provisions and burned up all their fuel. what is soldiers tore down what is Old North Church and used its rotten boards and timbers for firewood. To heighten their distress, what is smallpox broke out. They probably lost far more men by where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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