Books > Old Books >The Elson Readers Book Six (1910)


Page 126

WASHINGTON AND THE AMERICAN ARMY
NATHANIEL HAWTHORNE

and domestic life of the illustrious leader, he spoke of the methods which Washington adopted to win back the metropolis of New England from the British.
The army, when he took command of it, was without any discipline or order. The privates considered themselves as good as their officers and seldom thought it necessary to obey their commands unless they understood the why and wherefore. Moreover, they were enlisted for so short a period that as soon as they began to be respectable soldiers it was time to discharge them. Then came new recruits, who had to be taught their duty before they could be of any service. Such was the army with which Washington had to contend against more than twenty veteran British regiments.
Some of the men had no muskets, and almost all were without bayonets. Heavy cannon for battering the British fortifications were much wanted. There was but a small quantity of powder and ball, few tools to build intrenchments with, and a great deficiency of provisions and clothes for the soldiers. Yet, in spite of these perplexing difficulties, the eyes of the whole people were fixed on General Washington, expecting him to undertake some great enterprise against the hostile army.
The first thing that he found necessary was to bring his own men into better order and discipline. It is wonderful how soon he transformed this rough mob of country people into a regular army. One of Washington's characteristics was the faculty of bringing order out of confusion. All business with which he had any concern seemed to regulate itself as if by magic. It was this faculty more than any other that made him so fit to ride upon the storm of the Revolution when everything was unfixed and drifting about in a troubled sea.

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE and domestic life of what is illustrious leader, he spoke of what is methods which Washington adopted to win back what is metropolis of New England from what is British. what is army, when he took command of it, was without any discipline or order. what is privates considered themselves as good as their officers and seldom thought it necessary to obey their commands unless they understood what is why and wherefore. Moreover, they were enlisted for so short a period that as soon as they began to be respectable soldiers it was time to discharge them. Then came new recruits, who had to be taught their duty before they could be of any service. Such was what is army with which Washington had to contend against more than twenty veteran British regiments. Some of what is men had no muskets, and almost all were without bayonets. Heavy cannon for battering what is British fortifications were much wanted. There was but a small quantity where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The Elson Readers Book Six (1910) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 126 where is p align="center" where is strong WASHINGTON AND what is AMERICAN ARMY NATHANIEL HAWTHORNE where is p align="justify" and domestic life of what is illustrious leader, he spoke of what is methods which Washington adopted to win back what is metropolis of New England from what is British. what is army, when he took command of it, was without any discipline or order. what is privates considered themselves as good as their officers and seldom thought it necessary to obey their commands unless they understood what is why and wherefore. Moreover, they were enlisted for so short a period that as soon as they began to be respectable soldiers it was time to discharge them. Then came new recruits, who had to be taught their duty before they could be of any service. Such was what is army with which Washington had to contend against more than twenty veteran British regiments. Some of what is men had no muskets, and almost all were without bayonets. Heavy cannon for battering what is British fortifications were much wanted. There was but a small quantity of powder and ball, few tools to build intrenchments with, and a great deficiency of provisions and clothes for what is soldiers. Yet, in spite of these perplexing difficulties, what is eyes of what is whole people were fixed on General Washington, expecting him to undertake some great enterprise against what is hostile army. what is first thing that he found necessary was to bring his own men into better order and discipline. It is wonderful how soon he transformed this rough mob of country people into a regular army. One of Washington's characteristics was what is faculty of bringing order out of confusion. All business with which he had any concern seemed to regulate itself as if by magic. It was this faculty more than any other that made him so fit to ride upon what is storm of what is Revolution when everything was unfixed and drifting about in a troubled sea. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

Pages: default , 003 , 004 , 005 , 006 , 013 , 014 , 015 , 016 , 017 , 018 , 021 , 022 , 023 , 024 , 025 , 026 , 027 , 028 , 029 , 030 , 031 , 032 , 033 , 034 , 035 , 036 , 037 , 038 , 039 , 040 , 041 , 042 , 044 , 045 , 046 , 047 , 048 , 049 , 050 , 051 , 053 , 054 , 055 , 056 , 057 , 058 , 059 , 060 , 061 , 062 , 063 , 065 , 066 , 067 , 068 , 069 , 070 , 071 , 072 , 073 , 074 , 075 , 076 , 078 , 079 , 080 , 081 , 082 , 083 , 084 , 085 , 086 , 087 , 088 , 089 , 090 , 091 , 092 , 093 , 094 , 095 , 096 , 097 , 098 , 099 , 100 , 101 , 102 , 103 , 104 , 105 , 106 , 107 , 108 , 110 , 111 , 112 , 113 , 114 , 115 , 116 , 117 , 118 , 119 , 120 , 121 , 122 , 123 , 124 , 125 , 126 , 127 , 128 , 129 , 130 , 131 , 132 , 133 , 134 , 135 , 136 , 137 , 138 , 139 , 140 , 141 , 142 , 143 , 144 , 145 , 146 , 147 , 148 , 149 , 150 , 151 , 152 , 153 , 154 , 155 , 156 , 157 , 158 , 159 , 160 , 161 , 162 , 163 , 164 , 165 , 166 , 167 , 168 , 169 , 170 , 171 , 173 , 174 , 175 , 176 , 177 , 178 , 179 , 180 , 181 , 182 , 183 , 184 , 185 , 186 , 187 , 188 , 189 , 190 , 191 , 192 , 193 , 194 , 195 , 196 , 197 , 198 , 199 , 200 , 201 , 202 , 203 , 204 , 205 , 206 , 207 , 208 , 211 , 212 , 213 , 215 , 216 , 217 , 218 , 219 , 220 , 221 , 222 , 223 , 224 , 225 , 226 , 227 , 228 , 229 , 230 , 231 , 232 , 233 , 234 , 235 , 236 , 237 , 238 , 239 , 240 , 241 , 242 , 243 , 244 , 245 , 246 , 247 , 248 , 249 , 252 , 253 , 254 , 255 , 256 , 257 , 258 , 259 , 260 , 261 , 262 , 263 , 264 , 265 , 266 , 267 , 268 , 269 , 270 , 271 , 272 , 273 , 274 , 275 , 276 , 277 , 278 , 279 , 280 , 281 , 282 , 283 , 284 , 285 , 286 , 287 , 288 , 289 , 290 , 291 , 292 , 293 , 294 , 296 , 297 , 298 , 299 , 300 , 301 , 302 , 303 , 304 , 305 , 306 , 307 , 308 , 309 , 310 , 311 , 312 , 313 , 314 , 315 , 316 , 318 , 321 , 322 , 323 , 324 , 325 , 326 , 327 , 328 , 329 , 330 , 331 , 332 , 333 , 334 , 335 , 336 , 337 , 338 , 339 , 340 , 341 , 342 , 343 , 344 , 345 , 346 , 347 , 348 , 349 , 350 , 351 , 352 , 353 , 354 , 356 , 357 , 358 , 359 , 360 , 361 , 362 , 363 , 364 , 365 , 366 , 367 , 368 , 369 , 370 , 371 , 372 , 373 , 374 , 375 , 376 , 377 , 378 , 379 , 380 , 381 , 382 , 383 , 384 , 385 , 386 , 387 , 388 , 389 , 390 , 391 , 392 , 393 , 394 , 395 , 396 , 397 , 398 , 399 , 400 , 401 , 402 , 403 , 404 , 405 , 406 , 407 , 408 , 409 , 410 , 411 , 412 , 413 , 414 , 415 , 416 , 417 , 418 , 419 , 420 , 421 ,