Books > Old Books >The Elson Readers Book Six (1910)


Page 117

THE BOSTON TEA PARTY
NATHANIEL HAWTHORNE

Grandfather told the children that the first open resistance offered to the British troops in the province of Massachusetts was at Salem. Colonel Timothy Pickering, with thirty or forty militiamen, prevented the English colonel, Leslie, with four times as many regular soldiers, from taking possession of some military stores. No blood was shed on this occasion, but soon afterwards it began to flow.
General Gage sent eight hundred soldiers to Concord, about eighteen miles from Boston, to destroy some ammunition and provisions which the colonists had collected there. They set out on their march in the evening of the eighteenth of April, 1775. The next morning the general sent Lord Percy with nine hundred men to strengthen the troops that had gone before. All that day the inhabitants of Boston heard various rumors. Some said that the British were making great slaughter among our countrymen. Others affirmed that every man had turned out with his musket, and that not a single soldier would ever get back to Boston.
" It was after sunset," continued Grandfather, "when the troops who had marched forth so proudly were seen entering Charlestown. They were covered with dust and so hot and weary that their tongues hung out of their mouths. Many of them were faint with wounds. They had not all returned. Nearly three hundred were strewn, dead or dying, along the road from Concord. The yeomanry had risen upon the invaders and driven them back."
" Was this the battle of Lexington?" asked Charley.
" Yes," replied Grandfather; "it was so called because the British, without provocation, had fired upon a party of minutemen near Lexington meeting-house and killed eight of them. That fatal volley, which was fired by order of Major Pitcairn, began the war of the Revolution."
About this time, if Grandfather had been correctly informed

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE Grandfather told what is children that what is first open resistance offered to what is British troops in what is province of Massachusetts was at Salem. Colonel Timothy Pickering, with thirty or forty militiamen, prevented what is English colonel, Leslie, with four times as many regular soldiers, from taking possession of some military stores. No blood was shed on this occasion, but soon afterwards it began to flow. General Gage sent eight hundred soldiers to Concord, about eighteen miles from Boston, to destroy some ammunition and provisions which what is colonists had collected there. They set out on their march in what is evening of what is eighteenth of April, 1775. what is next morning what is general sent Lord Percy with nine hundred men to strengthen what is troops that had gone before. All that day what is inhabitants of Boston heard various rumors. Some said that what is British were making great slaughter among our countrymen. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" The Elson Readers Book Six (1910) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 117 where is p align="center" where is strong THE BOSTON TEA PARTY NATHANIEL HAWTHORNE where is p align="justify" Grandfather told what is children that what is first open resistance offered to what is British troops in what is province of Massachusetts was at Salem. Colonel Timothy Pickering, with thirty or forty militiamen, prevented what is English colonel, Leslie, with four times as many regular soldiers, from taking possession of some military stores. No blood was shed on this occasion, but soon afterwards it began to flow. General Gage sent eight hundred soldiers to Concord, about eighteen miles from Boston, to destroy some ammunition and provisions which what is colonists had collected there. They set out on their march in what is evening of what is eighteenth of April, 1775. what is next morning what is general sent Lord Percy with nine hundred men to strengthen what is troops that had gone before. All that day what is inhabitants of Boston heard various rumors. Some said that what is British were making great slaughter among our countrymen. Others affirmed that every man had turned out with his musket, and that not a single soldier would ever get back to Boston. " It was after sunset," continued Grandfather, "when the troops who had marched forth so proudly were seen entering Charlestown. They were covered with dust and so hot and weary that their tongues hung out of their mouths. Many of them were faint with wounds. They had not all returned. Nearly three hundred were strewn, dead or dying, along the road from Concord. what is yeomanry had risen upon what is invaders and driven them back." " Was this what is battle of Lexington?" asked Charley. " Yes," replied Grandfather; "it was so called because what is British, without provocation, had fired upon a party of minutemen near Lexington meeting-house and stop ed eight of them. That fatal volley, which was fired by order of Major Pitcairn, began what is war of what is Revolution." About this time, if Grandfather had been correctly informed where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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